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How to Crochet the Willow Wall Hanging

Hi guys! It's been a few weeks since I've posted anything new, so I'm excited to finally share this project with you. During the quarantine, I set a goal to only use materials that I have on hand. Thankfully, I was able to find a dowel and some pretty yarn to make this wall hanging. The neutral colours make this piece warm and inviting, while drawing attention to the beautiful stitches. This wall hanging uses less than 1 skein of yarn, so it's a great budget-friendly project. It's also really pretty! Need I say more? It's time to grab your favourite skein of yarn, pour yourself some tea (or coffee), and dive into the pattern. This post contains affiliate links that support the content on ThisPixieCreatesBlog. Each affiliate link has a * beside it. All opinions are my own. Find more information about affiliate links, as well as my Privacy & Disclosures Policy here. Thank you so much for your support! You can purchase an INEXPENSIVE Printable PDF of this pattern on Etsy HERE! This PDF includes the complete pattern, photo tutorials, and step-by-step pictures, so you can follow along on paper, highlight and make notes. It is a total of 16 pages including the cover page. Materials: Approximately 250 - 300 yds of any Weight 4 Medium Yarn *6.0mm crochet hook *Yarn Needle Scissors *Dowel (any size - pattern is written for 16" dowel) *Steamer or Iron on Steam Setting (highly recommended) Yarn Choice: At the beginning of the quarantine, I decided to organize my yarn - a huge 3 day undertaking. While looking through my stash, I came across a single skein of Loops and Threads Shimmer Luxe Yarn in the colour Winter White. It's a neutral self-striping yarn with a slight sheen and sparkle to it - so beautiful. I couldn't wait to share my project and yarn choice, until I realized that Loops and Threads stopped making this yarn. I'm sorry guys! If you happen to have a ball of this in your stash, it's perfect for this project, but there are so many other beautiful yarn choices out there. Any medium 4 worsted weight yarn will do the trick, so pick your favourite skein and start creating! Dowel Options: I've been wanting to make a wall hanging for months, but quarantine made me think twice about heading off to the hardware store to find a dowel. Then I noticed my wooden hanger! I pulled out some pliers to work the metal off the wood, and voila, I had a 16" dowel. Unfortunately, I've noticed that it's nearly impossible to find a 16" dowel online. Solution: If you don't have a wooden hanger or stick to hold up your wall hanging, I recommend making a trip to Home Depot or placing an order online. Dowels are really inexpensive ($1.88 for a 48" dowel). A 48" dowel can be cut into 3 equal pieces measuring 16". You can either cut the pieces yourself using a saw, or ask the staff to make the cuts for you. As long as you measure and mark the cuts yourself, they will be happy to help you! Abbreviations: St(s) - stitch/stitches Hk - hook Ch - chain Sp - space Sk - skip Dc - double crochet Fpdc - front-post double crochet Dc2tog - double crochet 2 stitches together Ps - puff stitch Ps2tog - puff 2 stitches together Rs - right side Ws - wrong side [] - Repeat the instructions inside the brackets according to the number of times indicated after the brackets. Gauge: Approximately 14 st(s) x 7 rows in 4 x 4" Ch 16 Row 1: Dc in 3rd ch from hk, and in each st across (14 dc). Turn. Row 2: Ch 2, fpdc around each st across (14 fpdc). Turn. Row 3 - 7: Repeat Row 1 - 2. Pattern Measurements: Puff Stitch: I've included a photo tutorial below, to guide you through the steps of making a puff stitch. However, if you prefer to learn through video, here is a link to an excellent tutorial by ExpressionsFiberArts. Step 1: Yarn over, and insert your hook into the stitch. Step 2: Yarn over and draw up a loop - you should have 3 loops on your hook. Step 3: Repeat Step 2, two more times - you should have 7 loops on your hook. Step 4: Yarn over and pull through the first 6 loops on your hook- you should have 2 loops remaining on your hook. Step 5: Yarn over and pull through the last 2 loops to close the stitch. Row 9 - 10 and the Ps2tog Stitch: Row 9 and 10 use a technique called puff stitching 2 stitches together (Ps2tog). This stitch is used to create a decrease at the beginning and end of each row, in order to make the edges of the wall hanging straight. In this first photo tutorial, I will be showing you how to ps2tog at the beginning and end of Row 9. Beginning of Row 9: Step 1: Yarn over, and insert your hook into the 1st stitch of Row 9. Step 2: Yarn over and draw up a loop. You should have 3 loops on your hook. Step 3: Yarn over and insert your hook into the 2nd stitch of Row 9. Step 4: Yarn over and draw up a loop. You should have 5 loops on your hook. Step 5: Repeat Step 3 - 4 once more. You should have 7 loops on your hook. Step 6: Yarn over and pull through the first 6 loops on your hook. You should have 2 loops remaining. Step 7: Yarn over and pull through the remaining two loops on your hook to secure this stitch. And you're done! End of Row 9: Step 1: Yarn over and insert your hook into the 2nd last stitch of Row 9. Step 2: Yarn over and draw up a loop. You should have 3 loops on your hook. Step 3: Repeat Step 1 - 2 once more. You should have 5 loops on your hook. Step 4: Yarn over and insert your hook into the last stitch of Row 9. Step 5: Yarn over and draw up a loop. You should have 7 loops on your hook. Step 6: Yarn over and pull through the first 6 loops on your hook. You should have 2 loops remaining. Step 7: Yarn over and pull through the remaining two loops on your hook to secure this stitch. And you're done! In this second photo tutorial, I will be showing you how to start and end row 10. Beginning of Row 10: Chain 2 and make a regular puff stitch in the first chain-1 space of row 10. Done! End of Row 10: Step 1: Yarn over and insert your hook into the last chain-1 space of Row 10. Step 2: Yarn over and draw up a loop. You should have 3 loops on your hook. Step 3: Repeat Step 1 - 2 once more. You should have 5 loops on your hook. Step 4: Yarn over and insert your hook into the beginning chain-2 space of Row 9. Yarn over and draw up a loop. You should have 7 loops on your hook. Step 5: Yarn over and pull through the first 6 loops on your hook. You should have 2 loops remaining. Step 6: Yarn over and pull through the remaining two loops on your hook to secure this stitch. And you're done! Let's get to the pattern! Pattern: Notes: The (dc, ch 1, dc) means that you will be working a double crochet, a chain-1, and another double crochet, all in one stitch. These are only worked in the center chain-1 spaces of the row. [] Repeat the instructions inside the brackets according to the number of times indicated after the brackets. The beginning chain of each row does NOT count as a stitch. A photo tutorial for the beginning and end of Row 9 and 10 are shown above. A photo tutorial for the ps2tog is shown above. In Row 10, you will only be working in the chain-1 spaces! Odd rows are the right side (Rs) and even rows are the wrong side (Ws). -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ch 17 Row 1 (Rs): Make 3 dc in 3rd ch from hk; dc in the next 6 st(s); (dc, ch 1, dc) in next st; dc in next 6 st(s); 3 dc in last st. Turn. (Stitch Count: 10 dc on each side of the triangle) Row 2 (Ws): Ch 2, 3 dc in 1st st; fpdc around next 9 st(s); (dc, ch 1, dc) in center ch -1 sp; fpdc around next 9 st(s); 3 dc in last st. Turn. (Stitch Count: 9 fpdc + 4 dc on each side of the triangle) Row 3: Ch 2, 3 dc in 1st st; dc in next 12 st(s); (dc, ch 1, dc) in center ch -1 sp; dc in next 12 st(s); 3 dc in last st. Turn. (Stitch Count: 16 dc on each side of the triangle) Row 4: Ch 2, 3 dc in 1st st; fpdc around next 15 st(s); (dc, ch 1, dc) in center ch -1 sp; fpdc around next 15 st(s); 3dc in last st. Turn. (Stitch Count: 15 fpdc + 4 dc on each side of the triangle) Row 5: Ch 2, 3 dc in 1st st; dc in next 18 st(s); (dc, ch 1, dc) in center ch -1 sp; dc in next 18 st(s); 3 dc in last st. Turn. (Stitch Count: 22 dc on each side of the triangle) Row 6: Ch 2, 3 dc in 1st st; fpdc around next 21 st(s); (dc, ch 1, dc) in center ch -1 sp; fpdc around next 21 st(s); 3 dc in last st. Turn. (Stitch Count: 21 fpdc + 4 dc on each side of the triangle) Row 7: Ch 2, 3 dc in 1st st; dc in next 24 st(s); (dc, ch 1, dc) in center ch -1 sp; dc in next 24 st(s); 3 dc in last st. Turn. (Stitch Count: 28 dc on each side of the triangle) Row 8: Ch 2, 3 dc in 1st st, fpdc around next 27 st(s); (dc, ch 1, dc) in center ch -1 sp; fpdc around next 27 st(s); 3 dc in last st. Turn. (Stitch Count: 27 fpdc + 4 dc on each side of the triangle) *Your work should be approximately 13.5 - 14.5" wide. The width of the wall hanging is no longer increasing; the length will continue to increase. Row 9: Ch 2, ps2tog, ch 1, sk 1 st, [ps in next st, ch 1, sk 1 st] 14 times; (ps, ch 1, ps, ch 1) in center ch -1 sp; sk 1 st, [ps in next st, ch 1, sk 1 st] 14 times; ps2tog. Turn. (Stitch Count: 16 Ps on each side of the triangle) Row 10: Ch 2, Ps in 1st ch-1 sp, ch 1; [ps in next ch-1 sp, ch 1] 14 times; (ps, ch 1, ps, ch 1) in center ch -1 sp; [ps in next ch-1 sp, ch 1] 14 times; ps2tog *(Photo Tutorial Above). Turn. (Stitch Count: 16 Ps on each side of the triangle) Row 11 - 12: Repeat Row 10. Row 13: Ch 2, dc2tog, dc in each st and ch-1 sp across until you reach the center ch-1 sp; (dc, ch 1, dc) in center ch-1 sp; dc in each st and ch-1 sp across until 2 st(s) remain; dc2tog. Turn. (Stitch Count: 31 dc on each side of the triangle) Row 14: Ch 2, dc2tog, fpdc around each st until you reach the center ch-1 sp; (dc, ch 1, dc) in center ch-1 sp; fpdc around each st until 2 st(s) remain; dc2tog. Turn. (Stitch Count: 29 fpdc + 2 dc on each side of the triangle) Row 15: Repeat Row 9. Row 16 - 18: Repeat Row 10. Row 19 - 20: Repeat Row 13 - 14. Row 21: Repeat Row 9. Row 22 - 24: Repeat Row 10. Row 25 - 26: Repeat Row 13 - 14. Row 27: Repeat Row 9. Row 28 - 30: Repeat Row 10. Row 31 - 32: Repeat Row 13 - 14. Row 33: Ch 2, dc2tog, dc in each st across until you reach the center ch-1 sp; (dc, ch 1, dc) in center ch-1 sp; dc in each st across until 2 st(s) remain; dc2tog. Turn. (Stitch Count: 31 dc on each side of the triangle) Fasten off and weave in ends! ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Blocking your Wall Hanging: Blocking your work is always optional, but I highly recommend it for this piece. If you've never blocked your work before, or you're unsure of what it means to "block" something, let's dive in. Blocking your work is done by wetting or steaming your crochet piece, which allows the stitches to relax, stretch out, and lie flat. Blocking will improve the drape of a crochet piece, so it's an important step when you crochet clothing or wall hangings. I've tried a few different ways of blocking, but my go-to method is to use a steamer or an iron on a steam setting. Simply lay your piece flat or vertically (depending on how your steamer works) and move the steamer/iron over your work. Make sure that the steamer/iron is at least 2 inches away from your work. Pull on your piece to straighten it out, and let it dry. If you don't have a steamer or iron, you can use straight pins to stretch and straighten out your work, before lightly spraying it with water. Allow the piece to dry overnight or wait 24 hours before unpinning it. Attaching the Wall Hanging to the Dowel: Now that your wall hanging is blocked, it's time to attach it to the dowel. Thread a yarn needle with a long tail (10") and insert the needle into the first stitch from underneath the dowel. Pull the yarn through the stitch and loop it around the dowel. Repeat this process in each stitch across. Make a knot at the end of the left side, and weave in the yarn tail. Repeat this process on the right side of the wall hanging. To hang the wall hanging on the wall, attach a 20" strand of yarn to each end of the dowel. Secure the strand with a knot at each end. Tip: If your wall hanging does not lie completely flat against the wall, put an invisible thumb tack in the bottom corners and center space to hold it in place. No one will be able to see these pins (I promise!). And You're Done! Congratulations! You've just made your first Willow Wall Hanging. If you loved this pattern, please share it, so that others can make it too! If you would like to explore some more fun and budget friendly crochet patterns on this blog, click here. Questions? If you have any trouble throughout the pattern and need some clarification, please feel free to send me a message through the "Contact" section of this website. I would be more than happy to help! Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you've made from this pattern; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates). If you liked this home decor project, and want to make another, try the Macrame Wall Hanging. This is a beginner friendly macrame project that uses 2 knots and scrap yarn to create a beautiful piece for your home. Thank you guys so much for following along. I can't wait to see what you create! Love, Dayna Instagram: @thispixiecreates

How to Crochet the For the Love of Texture Afghan

Hi guys! I am so excited to be sharing a new blanket pattern with you. It feels like it's been ages since I've posted about a blanket, so it's nice to switch things up, and bring some balance back to the blog. This blanket is made using the single crochet, half double crochet, and puff stitch to create tons of texture. There is also some fun colour work to hold your interest as you crochet. Whose ready to get started? This post contains affiliate links that support the content on ThisPixieCreatesBlog. Each affiliate link has a * beside it. All opinions are my own. Find more information about affiliate links, as well as my Privacy & Disclosures Policy here. Thank you so much for your support! You can purchase an INEXPENSIVE Printable PDF of this pattern on Etsy HERE! This PDF includes the complete pattern and step-by-step pictures, so you can follow along on paper, highlight and make notes. It is a total of 13 pages including the cover page. Inspiration: I started working on this blanket over a year and a half ago, and I didn't have an end goal in mind when I crocheted the first panel. I just played around with some stitches until I liked what I saw. I was able to finish the first three panels of the blanket before I got busy with other things; life always gets in the way of our crochet time, doesn't it? Anyway, this blanket got put on the back burner and thrown in the closet, until I re-discovered it during quarantine. While the isolation hasn't been great, I have to admit that it's given me plenty of time to crochet. Materials: Approximately 1700 yds of any medium 4 worsted weight yarn *6.5 mm crochet hook Scissors *Yarn Needle My Yarn Choice *Colour A: Vanna's Choice Weight 4 Medium (100% Acrylic, 170 yd/ 155 m, 3.5 oz/ 99 g) - Linen (3 skeins) *Colour B: Vanna's Choice Weight 4 Medium (100% Acrylic, 170 yd/ 155 m, 3.5 oz/ 99 g) - Honey (3 skeins) *Colour C: Caron One Pound Weight 4 Medium (100% acrylic, 812 yd/ 742 m, 454g/ 16 oz) - Denim (1 skein) Colour D: Bernat Premium Weight 4 Medium (100% Acrylic, 360 yd/ 329 m, 7 oz/ 198 g) - White (1 skein) Pattern Measurements This blanket measures 44" x 49", which is a little short for most throws (I sadly ran out of yarn). You can easily make this blanket longer by using the adjustment instructions below. The length and width of this blanket make it a nice size for a lapghan or a small throw. Width: 44” Length: 49” Making Adjustments to your Blanket Width: The width of your blanket is determined by your starting chain. The original pattern calls for chaining 148, but if you'd like to customize the width of your blanket (i.e. make it shorter/longer), your chain must be a multiple of 10 + 8. Length: To make your blanket shorter/longer than the original pattern, continue to repeat Row 7 - 18, until you are satisfied with the length of your blanket. Then finish the blanket with Row 115 - 123. The Puff Stitch Photo Tutorial I've included a photo tutorial below, to guide you through the steps of making a puff stitch. However, if you prefer to learn through video, here is a link to an excellent tutorial by ExpressionsFiberArts. In my blanket, I experimented with the size of the puff stitches to figure out which one I liked best. On the left, you'll see the puff stitch created by repeating step 2, two more times. On the right, you'll see the puff stitch created by repeating step 2, three more times. The more times you repeat step 2, the larger your puff stitch will be. Step 1: Yarn over, and insert your hook into the stitch. Step 2: Yarn over and draw up a loop - you should have 3 loops on your hook. Step 3: Repeat Step 2, two (or three) more times - you should have 7 (or 9) loops on your hook. Step 4: Yarn over and pull through the first 6 (or 8) loops on your hook- you should have 2 loops remaining on your hook. Step 5: Yarn over and pull through the last 2 loops to close the stitch. The Crossed Half Double Crochet Stitch The crossed half double crochet stitch looks like an "X" because one half double crochet is worked over the other. To make this stitch, skip the first stitch and work one half double crochet in the next stitch. Then, go back to the stitch you skipped, and work one half double crochet in that stitch. And you're done! If you prefer to see a visual, here is a link to a Youtube Tutorial that will familiarize you with this technique. Changing Colour Technique This blanket changes colour at the end of each panel, and throughout Row 8. Whether you are changing colour at the end of the row or mid-way through a row, the technique is the same. You will always be changing colours before you complete the final stitch in a given colour. For example, in Row 8, you will be working single crochets in white, and puff stitches in a different colour. The pattern tells you to make 4 single crochets between each puff stitch. Before you close the last single crochet (pulling through the two loops on your hook), drop the white yarn. Pick up the new colour (green) and pull it through the remaining 2 loops on your hook. You've closed the single crochet and changed colours! Let's get to the pattern! Abbreviations: St(s) - stitch(es) Hk - hook Ch - chain Sk - skip Sc - single crochet Hdc - half double crochet Ps - puff stitch [] - Repeat the instructions inside these brackets. Gauge: Approximately 14 st x 9 rows in 4” x 4” Ch 16 Row 1: Hdc in 3rd ch from hook and in each st across. Turn. (14 hdc) Row 2: Ch 2, hdc in 1st st, [sk 1 st, hdc in next st, hdc in skipped st] until 1 st remains. Hdc in last st of row. Turn. (2 hdc + 6 crossed hdc pairs) Row 3: Repeat Row 2. Row 4: Hdc in each st across. Turn. (14 hdc) Row 5 - 6: Repeat Row 4. Row 7 - 8: Repeat Row 2. Row 9: Repeat Row 4. Colour Chart: Pattern: Notes: Work the last stitch of each row in the beginning chain of the previous row, to create a straighter edge. In Row 8, you will be working with two colours. All of the single crochets are worked with Colour D (white) and all of the puff stitches are worked in the panel colour (blue, honey, or beige). *When you are crocheting row 8, make sure to carry your yarn through, so that you can easily change colour throughout the row. A colour chart is provided above to show when to change colour throughout the blanket. If you'd like a refresher on changing colour, there is a photo tutorial above to help you! The beginning chain of each row does NOT count as a stitch. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ch 148 (or a multiple of 10 + 8) Panel #1: Row 1: Hdc in 3rd ch from hk, and in each st across. Turn (146 hdc). Row 2: Ch 2, hdc in each st across. Turn (146 hdc). Row 3: Repeat Row 2. Row 4: Ch 2, hdc in first st, [sk 1 st, hdc in next st, hdc in skipped st] until 1 st remains; hdc in last st of row. Turn. (Stitch Count: 2 hdc, 72 crossed hdc pairs) Row 5: Repeat Row 4. Row 6: Repeat Row 2. Panel #2: Row 7: Ch 1, sc in each st across (146 sc). Turn. Row 8: Ch 1, sc in first 3 st(s), [ps in next st, sc in next 4 st(s)] until 3 st(s) remain; ps in next st, and sc in last 2 st(s) of row. Turn. (Stitch Count: 29 ps, 117 sc) Begin working your first set of single crochets in Colour D (white) and change colour before you finish your last single crochet (Picture 1 & 2). With your new colour (green), work a puff stitch in the next stitch (Picture 3). When there are two loops remaining on your hook, drop your new colour, and pull Colour D through the 2 loops on your hook to close the puff stitch (Picture 4 & 5). Now work the next set of single crochets with Colour D (Picture 6). Make sure to carry your yarn through as you crochet, so that you can easily make these colour changes (shown in Picture 6). Row 9: Repeat Row 7. Row 10: Repeat Row 2. Row 11 - 12: Repeat Row 4. Row 13 - 15: Repeat Row 2. Row 16 - 17: Repeat Row 4. Row 18: Repeat Row 2. Panel #3: Row 19 - 30: Repeat Row 7 - 18. Panel #4: Row 31 - 42: Repeat Row 7 - 18. Panel #5: Row 43 - 54: Repeat Row 7 - 18. Panel #6: Row 55 - 66: Repeat Row 7 - 18. Panel #7: Row 67 - 78: Repeat Row 7 - 18. Panel #8: Row 79 - 90: Repeat Row 7 - 18. Panel #9: Row 91 - 102: Repeat Row 7 - 18. Panel #10: Row 103 - 114: Repeat Row 7 - 18. If you'd like to make your blanket longer, repeat Row 7 - 18 until you are satisfied with the length of your blanket. Then finish the blanket with Rows 115 - 123. Panel # 11 (End): This panel is different! Row 115 - 123: Repeat Row 7 - 15. Fasten off and weave in ends! And You're Done! Congratulations! You've finished making your first For the Love of Texture blanket. I hope that you enjoyed making this as much as I did. If you loved this pattern, please share it, so that others can make it too! If you would like to explore some more fun and budget friendly crochet patterns on this blog, click here. Questions? If you have any trouble throughout the pattern and need some clarification, please feel free to send me a message through the "Contact" section of this website. I would be more than happy to help! Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you've made from this pattern; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates). If you liked this blanket and want to make another, try the Coziness is a Mood Throw. It's a fun, textured project that works up quickly and uses some of the softest yarn around! Thank you guys so much for following along. I can't wait to see what you create! Love, Dayna Instagram: @thispixiecreates

How to Crochet the That 70's Pillow Cover

Hi guys! Welcome to another crochet project that will add some character, texture, and colour to your space. At the beginning of the quarantine, my mom and I binge watched every season of That 70's Show, so this may have influenced my design a little - haha. I'll admit that this vintage green is not for everyone, but I absolutely love it. This colour is the perfect blend of bright energy and cozy warmth, making it a great addition to any room (in my opinion). The pillow is made using two stitches: single crochet and long double crochet. The long double crochet creates loose stitches that remind me of macrame; these stitches are not as uniform as regular double crochet stitches, but I think the unevenness brings some charm to the piece. This post contains affiliate links that support the content on ThisPixieCreatesBlog. Each affiliate link has a * beside it. All opinions are my own. Find more information about affiliate links, as well as my Privacy & Disclosures Policy here. Thank you for your support! About this Pillow Cover: It is made in two pieces (front and back); sewn together on three sides; and a zipper is placed on the fourth side to make it removable for washing. The front and back panels are identical. Each panel is designed using the single crochet and long double crochet stitch (a link to a tutorial for the long double crochet is provided below). This pillow cover is designed to fit a 12" x 20" pillow form. Materials: *2 Skeins of Yarn Bee Soft and Sleek Weight 4 Medium (100% Acrylic, 232 yd/ 212 m, 142 g / 5 oz) - Green Apple (used approximately 376 yds to complete this project) *12" x 20" Pillow Insert (any sized pillow form can be used) *5.5mm crochet hook *7.0mm crochet hook *Yarn Needle Scissors *18" Zipper Sewing Thread Sewing Needle The Long Double Crochet The long double crochet is exactly what it sounds like: a long double crochet stitch. If you haven't tried this stitch, prepare yourself for something fun! I've included a photo tutorial below to walk you through the stitch, but if you prefer to learn through video, here is a link to my video tutorial. Note: Tension is very important for this stitch because you want to be consistent with how much you pull to extend the stitch. The more consistent you are, the straighter your stitches will be. With your 7.0mm, chain 3. Pretend you are making a double crochet: Yarn over, and insert your hook into the first stitch of the row. Yarn over and draw up a loop. Once you've drawn up a loop, pull upwards to extend it as far as you can (1-2"). You should have three loops on your hook. Yarn over and pull through the first two loops on your hook. You should now have two loops remaining on your hook. Yarn over and pull through the remaining two loops on your hook. Repeat this process to make more long double crochet stitches! Right Side vs. Wrong Side Right Side: I consider the right side of the pillow cover to be the "wrong side" of the long double crochet stitch (picture to the left). The wrong side of the stitch juts out, looks a bit chaotic, and reminds me of macrame knots and loops. This is the side of the work that we want to see on the outside of our pillow cover. Wrong Side: I consider the wrong side of the pillow cover to be the "right side" of the long double crochet stitch (picture to the right). This is the side of the work that we do not want to see, so it will be on the inside of our pillow cover. Let's get to the pattern! Pattern Measurements: This pillow cover is designed to fit a 12" x 20" pillow form. Front Panel: 12" x 20" Back Panel: 12" x 20" Abbreviations: St(s) - stitch/stitches Hk - hook Ch - chain Sc - single crochet Long dc - long double crochet *Gauge: Approximately 15 stitches x 8 rows in 4" x 4" You might be tempted to skip this step, but since the insert has to fit inside of the pillow cover, it is important that your gauge is accurate before you start crocheting. Ch 16 Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hk, and in each st across. Turn. (15 sc) Row 2: Ch 1, sc in each st across. Turn. (15 sc) Row 3: Repeat Row 2. Row 4: Ch 3, long dc in each st across. Turn. (15 long dc) Row 5 - 7: Repeat Row 2. Row 8: Repeat Row 4. Pattern: Notes: Work the last stitch of each row in the beginning chain of the previous row, to create a straighter edge. The front and back panels are identical, so you will be making 2 front panels. The beginning chain of each row does NOT counts as a stitch. All of the single crochet rows will be worked using a 5.5mm hook, and the long double crochet rows will be worked using a 7.0mm hook. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Front Panel *Make 2: With a 5.5mm hook: Ch 69 Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hk, and in each st across (68 sc). Turn. Row 2: Ch 1, sc in each st across (68 sc). Turn. Row 3: Repeat Row 2. With a 7.0mm hook: Row 4: Ch 3, long dc in each st across (68 long dc). Turn. With a 5.5mm hook: Row 5 - 7: Repeat Row 2. With a 7.0mm hook: Row 8: Repeat Row 4. With a 5.5mm hook: Row 9 - 11: Repeat Row 2. With a 7.0mm hook: Row 12: Repeat Row 4. With a 5.5mm hook: Row 13: Repeat Row 2. With a 7.0mm hook: Row 14: Repeat Row 4. With a 5.5mm hook: Row 15: Repeat 2. With a 7.0mm hook: Row 16: Repeat Row 4. With a 5.5mm hook: Row 17 - 19: Repeat Row 2. With a 7.0mm hook: Row 20: Repeat Row 4. With a 5.5mm hook: Row 21 - 23: Repeat Row 2. With a 7.0mm hook: Row 24: Repeat Row 4. With a 5.5mm hook: Row 25 - 29: Repeat Row 2. Fasten off and weave in ends! *Repeat once more to make the back panel. Sewing Your Panels and Adding a Zipper You never know how your pillow will turn out until you sew the sides together and pop in the insert. To sew these panels together, we will be using a technique called the whip stitch. If you are unfamiliar with this stitch, there is a great tutorial by Wool and the Gang to help you here. Method: Line up your front and back panels, so the wrong sides are touching, and the right sides are facing outward. Thread your yarn needle with a long strand of yarn (approx. 30 - 40"). Begin whip stitching along the three sides of your pillow cover. For a detailed tutorial for adding in the zipper, you can find it at the bottom of the Whimsical Stripes Pillow Pattern. There is a step-by-step photo tutorial to walk you through the process. And You're Done! Voila! You have finished your first That 70's Pillow. Congratulations! I hope that this pillow brightens up your home, and adds some coziness to your space. If you would like to explore some more fun and budget friendly crochet patterns on this blog, click here. Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you've made from this pattern; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates). Questions? If you have any trouble throughout the pattern and need some clarification, please feel free to send me a message through the "Contact" section of this website. I would be more than happy to help! If you liked this pillow project, and want to make another, try the Burst of Sunshine Pillow. It's a fun, textured project that will brighten up your home, and leave you with a super soft pillow. Thank you guys so much for following along. I can't wait to see what you create! Love, Dayna Instagram: @thispixiecreates

DIY Button Pin Display Board Tutorial

Hi guys! Today, I am taking a break from my usual crochet posts to write about a recent DIY project of mine. Last Christmas, I decided to make Logan a button display board. He went on about how many button pins he had collected over the years - from concerts, to events, to places he's traveled. A week before Christmas, I went in search of the buttons. I looked everywhere: boxes, containers, drawers, closets, desks, etc. Guess how many buttons I found? 6! We still don't know where the rest are hiding. So what did I do? I ordered him 3 more buttons, and set to work on the display. Trust me, when I say that the initial display board was a disaster; I didn't take a picture before I tossed it - sorry guys. I let the project sit for a few months, before I came up with a new design that is easy, inexpensive, and fun to make - what more could you ask for? This post contains affiliate links that support the content on ThisPixieCreatesBlog. Each affiliate link has a * beside it. All opinions are my own. Find more information about affiliate links, as well as my Privacy & Disclosures Policy here. Thank you for your support! Where did the Buttons come from? Before we dive into the tutorial, I wanted to show you some of the cooler pins we have on our display board: Logan loves Hocus Pocus, so I ordered him Mary, Winifred, and Sarah Sanderson witch pins from the graphic artist, Kwanalee. The last pin I wanted to talk about came from Screaming Heads. During our first year together, Logan and I decided to go on a road trip through Michigan and Ontario. We started in Port Huron, and traveled through some of the cutest small towns in Michigan, before we crossed into Ontario through Sault St. Marie (a border city). One of our Ontario destinations was Huntsville, a picturesque town in the Muskoka region. Before we got to Huntsville, we made a pit-stop in a town called Burk's Falls. A few miles from town, we found Screaming Heads, an outdoor art exhibit featuring concrete screaming heads, spread over 310 acres of land. It was weird, cool, amazing, eerie, and so many other things - it's one of those things that you have to see at least once in your life. The owner of this property opens his home to the public, so people can walk around and experience his art for free. Before we left, Logan made sure to get a button (pictured above) to remind of us this experience. If you are ever in Ontario, this is one spot that you should check out! Logan and I are looking forward to adding more buttons to our display board as we travel and grow old together (haha). Without further ado, let's dive into the tutorial to see how this display board is made! What you will Need for this Project: *Picture frame (any size) *1 sheet of brown bristol board OR card stock Exacto-knife or Scissors Permanent Marker (black) Ruler *Refrigerator Magnets Button pins to display Note: Most of the above materials can be found at the Dollar Tree (a dollar store based in the U.S. and Canada). If you are looking to save money on a picture frame, consider thrifting one! Instead of spending $20+ on a brand new frame, you could spend anywhere from $1 - $10. Most thrift stores have special discount days though, where frames are 50% off. Tip: It's easy to get discouraged when thrifting frames, but I try to look for solid, good quality frames that will hold up over time. The aesthetic of the frame isn't important because it can always be changed by sanding, staining, or painting it. Step 1: Prepare your Back Drop Measure your picture frame to determine the exact dimensions of the frame. With scissors or an exacto-knife, cut the bristol board to the exact dimensions of the frame; this is your back drop. Step 2: Design your Back Drop With a ruler and a permanent marker, begin designing your back drop. Start by drawing lines; these can be vertical, horizontal, or diagonal. Play around with the thickness and direction of each line. Just have fun with it! I've included some progress shots, as well as a final photo below, if you'd like a template. Step 3: Reinforce your Back Drop Once your design is complete, staple your back drop to a second piece of Bristol board that is the same size, by placing two staples in each corner. This will reinforce your back drop, making it sturdier, but not too thick that the magnets won't work. Step 4: Remove the Glass from the Picture Frame Remove the glass from the picture frame because you will not be needing it for this project. The button pins are too thick to fit between the glass and the frame. Step 5: Place the Back Drop in the Frame Place your back drop in the frame, and make sure it's facing you. This will help you figure out where you want to position your buttons. Step 6: Get your Button Pins and Magnets Organized Each button requires at least one magnet to hold it in place on the display board. On the front side of your display, hold the button in place, while placing a circular magnet on the back of your display. The magnet should hold up your button. If your button starts to slide down when you let go of it, place a second magnet behind it. Some buttons are heavier than others, so they require more than one magnet to hold them in place. Repeat this process, until all of your buttons are positioned on your display board! Step 7: Add a Backing to your Display Board Since this was a thrifted frame, I used the backing that came with my frame (pictured below). Placing the backing on your frame will give the display more stability. When you want to add more buttons to your display, simply remove the backing, and replace it when you're done. And You're Done! You just made a button display board! I hope that this project will bring back fond memories as you sift through your button pins. If you want to try more fun projects, click here to explore my blog. Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you've made from this tutorial; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates). Questions? If you have any trouble throughout this tutorial and need some clarification, please feel free to send me a message through the "Contact" section of this website. I would be more than happy to help! Thank you guys so much for following along. I can't wait to see what you create! Love, Dayna Instagram: @thispixiecreates

DIY Macrame Wall Hanging Tutorial Using Scrap Yarn

Hi guys! I hope you are all staying safe and sane during this time because isolation can really take its toll on our mental health and creativity. It can be hard to know what to do with ourselves during this time. Do we relax and pretend like its a vacation? Do we take care of our homes? Focus on our health? Start a business? Create every day? I think we should do whatever will help us get through the day. If you want to take a bath and read a book, you do it! If you need to lie in bed and watch TV for the entire day (me), you do it! We shouldn't let the expectations of others determine how we spend our time. If you are having a hard time right now, and need to talk to someone, please don't hesitate to reach out to me. I'd be happy to listen. Now, without further ado, let's dive into this macrame wall hanging! This post contains affiliate links that support the content on ThisPixieCreatesBlog. Each affiliate link has a * beside it. All opinions are my own. Find more information about affiliate links, as well as my Privacy & Disclosures Policy here. Thank you for your support! Since we're all stuck inside, and strongly discouraged to make trips to Michaels (even if they do curb side pick up), we have to use what we have on hand. Luckily, I had some yarn and half an embroidery hoop. It took me days to figure out what I wanted to do with this piece, but I promise that it will only take you an hour or so to make, since you have a template to follow. Materials: Approximately 200 - 300 yds of scrap yarn (every type of yarn I used is listed below) *10" embroidery hoop (You can use any sized hoop, whether it be an embroidery hoop, macrame hoop, or hoola hoop) Scissors *Steamer OR an iron with a steam setting (optional) My Yarn Choice: If you like some of the colours in my wall hanging, I've included a link to each type of yarn I used below. *A: Lion Brand Wool-Ease Thick and Quick Weight 6 Super Bulky (80% acrylic, 20% wool, 106 yd/ 97 m, 6 oz/ 170 g) - Fisherman *B: Red Heart Soft Essentials Weight 5 Bulky (100% acrylic, 131 yd/ 120 m, 5 oz/ 141 g) - Biscuit C: White Crimped yarn from the thrift store - no tags *D: Lion Brand Wool-Ease Thick and Quick Weight 6 Super Bulky (80% acrylic, 20% wool, 106 yd/ 97 m, 6 oz/ 170 g) - Butterscotch *E: Red Heart Hygge Weight 5 Bulky (70% Acrylic and 30% Nylon, 132 yd/ 121 m, 5 oz/ 142g) - Lavender *F: Lion Brand Jeans Weight 4 Medium (100% Acrylic, 246yd/ 225 m, 100 g/ 3.5 oz) -Top Stitch Other projects you might enjoy - shown in the picture above: Purple Hygge Crochet Blanket: How to Crochet the Coziness is a Mood Blanket Grey Arrow Striped Pillow: How to Crochet the Whimsical Stripes Pillow Green Pillow: Coming to the Blog Soon! Reverse Lark's Head Knot Tutorial The main knot that we are going to be using throughout the piece is called the Reverse Lark's Head knot. This knot is used to attach each strand of yarn to the hoop. I've included a photo tutorial below to show you how to attach each strand of yarn using a reverse lark's head knot. However, if you prefer to learn through videos, here is a link to a great tutorial by Modern Macrame. Begin by folding your yarn strand in half, making a loop at one end. Take the loop portion of the strand and insert it underneath your hoop. Pull the loop up with your finger. With your thumb and index finger, open the loop wide, while moving the two yarn strands up towards the loop, with your other hand. Pick up the two yarn strands with your thumb and index finger, and begin to pull it through the loop. Continue pulling the two strands through the loop until the ends are outside of the loop. Grab the ends of the strands and slowly pull to close the loop. This will create a knot. Tighten the loop as much as you can. You've just made a reverse lark's head knot! Regular Knot Tutorial The second knot that we are going to be using doesn't have a name (sorry guys!), so we are going to call it the regular knot. You will be making a total of 18 regular knots, and I promise that it's really easy once you get the hang of it. Below is a tutorial for making the regular knot. You will be working with one strand at a time. Make sure that the strand is lying ON TOP of the hoop. Move the end of the strand underneath the hoop. Move the yarn tail OVER TOP of the portion that is lying on top of the hoop. This creates a loop/hole. Place the yarn tail into the loop/hole by going underneath the top strand. Pick up the yarn tail and pull it through the loop/hole. Continue to pull on the yarn tail to close the loop/hole and make a knot. Tighten it as much as you can, to make sure it's secure. You've made your first regular knot! The Macrame Wall Hanging Tutorial Now that you've learned how to make a reverse lark's head knot, and a regular knot, let's start making our wall hanging. Step 1: Choose Your Yarn Colours and Textures It's time to decide which colours and textures work well together. For my wall hanging, I wanted varying weights of yarn and texture to add some visual interest to the piece. I chose some weight 2, 4, 5, and 6 yarn, along with acrylic, wool, crimped, and hygge textured yarn. Play around with your yarn stash and see what you come up with! For the top design, I chose neutral colours (A, B, and C) because I wanted to draw attention to it, without overpowering the bottom fringe. There was already a lot of colour and texture going on down there, so I didn't want to overdo it. Step 2: Cut Your Yarn into Strands For the top design, you will need 9 strands measuring approximately 54". Colour A: 3 Strands Colour B: 3 Strands Colour C: 3 Strands For the bottom fringe, you will need 35 strands measuring approximately 34". Colour A: 3 Strands Colour B: 19 Strands Colour C: 5 Strands Colour D: 3 Strands Colour E: 3 Strands Colour F: 2 Strands Note: Some of my yarn was very thin, particularly Colour C and Colour F. While I loved the texture and colour of both yarns, I wanted them to stand out and fill more space within the hoop. To make them thicker, I cut multiple strands of each and attached them as one strand. For example, I bundled 4 strands of Colour C together before attaching it to the hoop. I also bundled 5 strands of Colour F together (picture below). Step 3: Top Design You will be working with your 9 longest strands of yarn (54"). Section #1: With a reverse lark's head knot (tutorial above), attach 3 strands of Colour A, about 1.25 inches to the right of the center of the hoop. You will now have 6 strands of yarn to work with. Separate your strands, so that you are only working with the outer most strand. You will be making a regular knot to attach it to the bottom of the hoop (tutorial above). Repeat the regular knot 5 more times, working with the next outer most strand, to finish off section #1. Section #2: With a reverse lark's head knot, attach 3 strands of Colour B to the right of Colour A. Separate your strands, so that you are only working with the outer most strand. You will be making a regular knot, approximately 3" to the left of Section #1, to attach it to the bottom of the hoop. Repeat the regular knot 5 more times, working with the next outer most strand, to finish off section #2. Section #3: Attach 3 strands of Colour C directly beside Colour B, using a reverse lark's head knot. Separate your strands, so that you are only working with the outer most strand. You will be making a regular knot, approximately 3.5" to the left of Section #2, to attach it to the bottom of the hoop. The 5.5" measurement is there to show you that the last strand of section #3 sits about 5.5" below the top of the hoop. Repeat the regular knot 5 more times, working with the next outer most strand, to finish off section #3. Step 4: Attaching the Colourful Fringe Now that we've attached our 9 longest strands of yarn, it's time to add in some colour! We will be attaching each strand with a reverse lark's head knot to fill the space between our long strands. I've included a colour breakdown chart below to guide you through the number of strands and specific colours needed to fill each part. Step 5: Steam and Cut After attaching all of the yarn to the hoop, the final step is to steam the yarn ends and give the wall hanging a hair-cut. Steaming can be done using an iron (on steam setting), or a *garment steamer. If you choose to use an iron, make sure that it's 1-2 inches away from your yarn. You never want your iron to touch your fabric. Using steam on your yarn will help get rid of any curls or waves in your wall hanging, allowing the yarn to lengthen and lie straight. For my wall hanging, I used a steamer to slowly work through each section. I found that it worked best when I moved the steamer from the top of the fringe to the bottom. Once you are happy with how straight your yarn is, grab your scissors and cut your wall hanging. I gave the bottom fringe a bit of a semi-circle shape because I found that this looked best with the hoop. Each strand ended up measuring between 15 and 15.5" in length. And You're Done! You just made a macrame wall hanging! I hope that this project brightens up your home, and puts a smile on your face every time you see it. If you want to try more fun projects to add to your space, click here to explore my blog. Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you've made from this pattern; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates). Questions? If you have any trouble throughout this tutorial and need some clarification, please feel free to send me a message through the "Contact" section of this website. I would be more than happy to help! Thank you guys so much for following along. I can't wait to see what you create! Love, Dayna Instagram: @thispixiecreates

How to Crochet the Whimsical Stripes Pillow

Hi guys, I hope you are all staying safe and sane during this pandemic. Even in this dark time, I'm grateful that I have crochet to relieve some stress and focus my mind. When I first learned that the borders between the U.S. and Canada would be closed for non-essential travel, I knew that I would not be able to visit my husband - a story for another time. Up until this point, my creative energy was focused on designing pieces for his home, so I never put much effort into making my temporary space my own. Since I'm not going anywhere for the foreseeable future, I decided to make my space a little cozier by designing this throw pillow for my bed - it was also a great way to use up some of my yarn stash! This post contains affiliate links that support the content on ThisPixieCreatesBlog. Each affiliate link has a * beside it. All opinions are my own. Find more information about affiliate links, as well as my Privacy & Disclosures Policy here. Thank you for your support! You can purchase an INEXPENSIVE Printable PDF of this pattern on Etsy HERE! This PDF includes the complete pattern and step-by-step pictures, along with a photo tutorial for changing colour, so you can follow along on paper, highlight and make notes. It is a total of 16 pages including the cover page. About this Pillow Cover: It is made in two pieces (front and back); sewn together on three sides; and a zipper is placed on the fourth side to make it removable for washing. The front and back panels are identical. Each panel consists of a main colour (gray) separated by stripes of colour (scrap yarn pieces). Each panel is designed using a modified version of the moss stitch. So if you know how to single crochet and chain, then this is a great project for you. This pillow cover is designed to fit a 12" x 20" pillow form. What you Will Need for this Project: 2 Skeins of any Weight 4 Medium Yarn Scrap yarn of different colours for the stripes (must be weight 4 medium) *12" x 20" Pillow Insert (any sized pillow form can be used) *5.5mm crochet hook *Yarn Needle Scissors *18" Zipper Sewing Thread Sewing Needle My Yarn Choice: If you like some of the colours in my pillow, I've included a link to each type of yarn I used. Main Colour: *Light Gray - 2 Skeins of I Love this Yarn Solids Weight 4 Medium (100% acrylic, 355 yd/ 324 m, 198 g/ 7 oz) OR *Light Grey - 2 Skeins of Red Heart Super Saver Weight 4 Medium (100% acrylic, 364 yd/ 333 m, 198 g/7 oz) Scrap Yarn Stripes (in order of appearance): A: Bernat Premium Weight 4 Medium (100% Acrylic, 360 yd/ 329 m, 198 g/ 7 oz) - Navy *B: Lion Brand Jeans Weight 4 Medium (100% Acrylic, 246yd/ 225 m, 100 g/ 3.5 oz) -Top Stitch *C: Yarn Bee Soft and Sleek Weight 4 Medium (100% Acrylic, 232 yd/ 212 m, 142 g / 5 oz) - French Lilac *D: Red Heart Soft Weight 4 Medium (100% acrylic, 256 yd/ 234 m, 141 g/ 5 oz) -Grape *E: I Love this Yarn Print Weight 4 Medium (100% acrylic, 252 yd/ 230 m, 141 g / 5 oz) - Teal Tweed *F: Caron One Pound Weight 4 Medium (100% acrylic, 812 yd/ 742 m, 454g/ 16 oz) - Denim The Moss Stitch - Our Pillow Stitch The moss stitch (a.k.a. linen, granite or woven stitch - it has so many different names!) is my favourite crochet stitch. There is just something about this stitch that keeps me coming back to it again and again. It's a true back to basic stitch that uses only a single crochet and chain stitch. If you are unfamiliar with the moss stitch, here is a great tutorial to help you. Usually, the moss stitch is worked in rows, but I worked the stitch in a triangle to achieve the look of arrows. Each panel (front and back) begins as a small triangle that increases with each row; with the use of some decreases, we can turn this triangle into a rectangle. Below, I've included a diagram of each stage of the panel, so that you are not surprised by the shape of your panel as you work through the pattern. Instructions will be provided to show you exactly how to increase and decrease. 1. Each panel starts out as a small triangle, that increases along the three sides shown (center, bottom left, and bottom right). 2. Eventually, the base of the triangle (a.k.a the width of our rectangular panel) will reach 12". From this point on, our width will no longer increase, but our length (height of triangle) will continue to increase. 3. Once the height of the triangle (from base to top) measures 20", we will no longer be increasing. 4. We will start to decrease along both sides of our triangle, until we make a rectangle. Changing Colour Method: Creating stripes of colour might look difficult, but I promise that it is easier than you think. Making stripes in this pillow is the exact same as changing colour at the end of a row. Below, I've included a photo tutorial of how to change colour throughout your work. At the end of the row, pretend like you are making your final single crochet stitch. Insert your hook into the space, yarn over and pull up a loop. You should have two loops on your hook. Instead of yarning over and drawing through both loops with the gray yarn, pick up your new colour. Pull the new colour (purple) through both loops on your hook to complete the single crochet stitch. Turn your work. Chain 2 to start your next row, and keep crocheting. You've changed colours! Let's get to the pattern! Pattern Measurements: This pillow cover is designed to fit a 12" x 20" pillow form. Front Panel: 12" x 20" Back Panel: 12" x 20" Pictured with the Whimsical Stripes Pillow is the Coziness is a Mood Blanket. You can find the pattern here. Abbreviations: St(s) - stitch/stitches Hk - hook Ch - chain Sp - space Sk - skip Sc - single crochet [] - Repeat the instructions inside the brackets according to the number of times indicated after the brackets. Gauge: Approximately 10 stitches x 15 rows in 4" x 4" You might be tempted to skip this step, but since the insert has to fit inside of the pillow cover, it is important that your gauge is accurate before you start crocheting. Ch 19 Row 1: Sc in 3rd ch from hk, [ch 1, sk 1 ch, sc in next ch] to end of row. Turn. Row 2: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch-1 sp, [ch 1, sc in next ch-1 sp] to end of row. The last stitch should be a sc in the beg ch-2 of Row 1. Turn. Row 3 - 15: Repeat Row 2. Colour Chart: Here is a chart to help you create a striped colour pattern on your panel. You'll notice that each stripe of colour usually occurs after working 5 rows in your main colour choice (gray). Pattern: Notes: If you would like to create stripes in your pattern, follow the colour chart above to keep track of when to change colours. The (sc, ch 1, sc) means that you will be working a single crochet, a chain-1, and another single crochet, all in one stitch. These are only worked in the center and last chain spaces of the row. [] Repeat the instructions inside the brackets according to the number of times indicated after the brackets. Ex. [ch 1, sk 1 st, (sc, ch 1, sc) in next ch] 2 times, means you will make a chain-1, skip 1 stitch, and make a single crochet, chain-1, and single crochet, all in the next chain. This will be done a total of 2 times before moving onto the next instructions. The front and back panel are identical, so you will be making 2 front panels. After Row 1, you will be working each stitch into the chain spaces of the previous row. The beginning chain 2 counts as a single crochet and a chain 1. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Front Panel *Make 2: Ch 7 Row 1: Sc in 3rd ch from hk, [ch 1, sk 1 ch, (sc, ch 1, sc) in next ch] 2 times. Turn. (Stitch Count: 3 sc on each side of the triangle) Row 2: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch-1 sp; ch 1, sc in next ch-1 sp; ch 1, (sc, ch 1, sc) in center ch-1 sp; ch 1, sc in next ch-1 sp; ch 1, (sc, ch 1, sc) in ch-2 sp. Turn. (Stitch Count: 4 sc on each side of the triangle) Row 3: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] 2 times; ch 1, (sc, ch 1, sc) in center ch-1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] 2 times; ch 1, (sc, ch 1, sc) in ch-2 sp. Turn. (Stitch Count: 5 sc on each side of the triangle) Row 4: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] 3 times; ch 1, (sc, ch 1, sc) in center ch-1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] 3 times; ch 1, (sc, ch 1, sc) in ch-2 sp. Turn. (Stitch Count: 6 sc on each side of the triangle) Row 5: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] 4 times; ch 1, (sc, ch 1, sc) in center ch-1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] 4 times; ch 1, csc, ch 1, sc) in ch-2 sp. Turn. (Stitch Count: 7 sc on each side of the triangle) Do you see the pattern? Each side of the triangle increases by 1 single crochet every row. You will begin each row by chaining 2 and making a single crochet into the 1st chain-1 space (this counts as a sc, ch 1, sc). Then, you will (ch 1 and sc) in each ch-1 space until you reach the center ch-1 space of the triangle. In the center, you will make a (sc, ch 1, sc). Continue to work a (ch 1 and sc) in each ch-1 space until you reach the last ch-2 space, where you will work a (sc, ch 1, sc). Row 6 - 18: Continue to repeat the above pattern. (Stitch Count at the end of Row 18: 20 sc on each side of the triangle) Your triangle should be 12" wide. We will no longer be increasing on each side, but we will still be increasing at the center of the triangle. Row 19: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] until you reach the center; ch 1, (sc, ch 1, sc) in center ch-1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] until you reach the last ch- sp; sc in ch-2 sp. Turn. *Do not chain 1 between the last two single crochet of the row. (Stitch Count: 21 sc on one side, 20 sc on the other side of the triangle) Row 20 - 67: Repeat Row 19. The height of your triangle should be 20". We will no longer be increasing at the center of the triangle. We will now start to decrease along the left side of the triangle. Do not fasten off. Left Side of the Triangle (Side with 21 sc): Row 68: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] 18 times; sc in center ch-1 sp; Turn. *Do not chain 1 between the last two single crochet of the row. (Stitch Count: 21 sc) Row 69: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] 17 times; sc in ch-2 sp; Turn. (Stitch Count: 20 sc) Row 70: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] 16 times; sc in ch-2 sp; Turn. (Stitch Count: 19 sc) Row 71: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] 15 times; sc in ch-2 sp; Turn. (Stitch Count: 18 sc) Do you see the pattern? Each side of the triangle decreases by 1 single crochet every row. Row 72 - 84: Continue to repeat the above pattern. (Stitch Count for Row 84: 5 sc) Row 85: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp; sc in ch-2 sp; Turn. (Stitch Count: 4 sc) Row 86: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; sc in ch-2 sp. (Stitch Count: 3 sc) Fasten off. Right Side of the Triangle (Side with 20 sc): Row 68: Starting in the center ch- 1 sp, (ch 1, sc); [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] 17 times; sc in ch- 2 sp; Turn. *Do not chain 1 between the last two single crochet of the row. (Stitch Count: 20 sc) Row 69: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] 16 times; sc in ch-2 sp; Turn. (Stitch Count: 19 sc) Row 70: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; [ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp] 15 times; sc in ch-2 sp; Turn. (Stitch Count: 18 sc) Do you see the pattern? Each side of the triangle decreases by 1 single crochet every row. Row 71 - 83: Continue to repeat the above pattern. (Stitch Count for Row 83: 5 sc) Row 84: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; ch 1, sc in next ch- 1 sp; sc in ch-2 sp; Turn. (Stitch Count: 4 sc) Row 85: Ch 2, sc in 1st ch- 1 sp; sc in ch-2 sp; Turn. (Stitch Count: 3 sc). Row 86: Ch 2, sc in ch-2 sp. (Stitch Count: 2 sc). Fasten off and weave in ends. *Repeat this process to make your back panel. Sewing Your Panels and Adding a Zipper This is arguably the worst part of any crochet project, but when it comes to pillows, it's exciting. You never know how your pillow cover will turn out until you sew the sides together and pop in the insert. To sew these panels together, we will be using a technique called the whip stitch. If you are unfamiliar with this stitch, there is a great tutorial by Wool and the Gang to help you here. Wrong Side vs. Right Side: On the wrong side of the panel, the coloured stripe stitches appear narrow and "pointy" like diamonds. On the right side of the panel, the coloured stripe stitches are fuller and more rectangular in shape. Method: Line up your front and back panels, so the right sides are touching, and the wrong sides are facing outward - basically we are sewing our work inside out. This is to hide any wobbly edges and fix the bottom center which juts out a bit, compared to the rest of the rectangle. Thread your yarn needle with a long strand of yarn (approx. 30 - 40"). Begin whip stitching along the three sides of your pillow cover. Flip your pillow cover right side out. The next step is to attach the zipper to the fourth side. Place the zipper between the front and back panels panels, making sure that it is centered on both sides (A). You will be sewing one side of the zipper to the front panel and the other side of the zipper to the back panel. Sewing the Zipper to the Front Panel: Using thread and a sewing needle, begin whip stitching across the zipper and front panel to sew them together; make sure that the needle moves through both the panel and the zipper (B, C, D, E). When you've reached the end of the zipper, make a couple of knots to secure your work. Tip: Try to sew the panel as close to the zipper opening as possible; this will ensure a seamless look. Sewing the Zipper to the Back Panel: Unzip the zipper before you begin to sew the back panel to the other side of the zipper. Using thread and a sewing needle, begin whip stitching across the zipper and back panel to sew them together; make sure that the needle moves through both the panel and the zipper. When you've reached the end of the zipper, make a couple of knots to secure your work (F, G, H, I, J, K). If your zipper is an inch or two shorter than the width of the pillow, use your remaining yarn tail to sew up any gaps on the fourth side with the whip stitch. And You're Done! Voila! You have finished your first Whimsical Stripes Pillow. Congratulations! I hope that this pillow brightens up your home, and puts a smile on your face every time you see it. Now, you can cozy up with this pillow, while you work on your next crochet project. If you would like to explore some more fun and budget friendly crochet patterns on this blog, click here. Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you've made from this pattern; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates). Questions? If you have any trouble throughout the pattern and need some clarification, please feel free to send me a message through the "Contact" section of this website. I would be more than happy to help! If you liked this pillow project, and want to make another, try the Burst of Sunshine Pillow. It's a fun, textured project that will brighten up your home, and leave you with a super soft pillow. Thank you guys so much for following along. I can't wait to see what you create! Love, Dayna Instagram: @thispixiecreates

How to Crochet the Coziness is a Mood Blanket

Hi guys! In this post, we will be indulging in some selfish crochet. "Selfish crochet? What? I never make anything for myself," you might be thinking. Well, it's time to change that. Today is all about you. It's about taking a step back from creating for other people, to make something special for yourself. As Donna and Tom from Parks and Rec would say, "Treat yo' self!". This crochet throw is designed to reflect coziness, self-care, and indulgence. It is made using a large crochet hook - to help speed up the making process - and soft, luxurious yarn that won't break your budget (I promise). Let's get started! This post contains affiliate links that support the content on ThisPixieCreatesBlog. Each affiliate link has a * beside it. All opinions are my own. Find more information about affiliate links, as well as my Privacy & Disclosures Policy here. Thank you for your support! You can purchase an INEXPENSIVE Printable PDF of this pattern on Etsy HERE! This PDF includes the complete pattern and step-by-step pictures, so you can follow along on paper, highlight and make notes. It is a total of 8 pages, including the cover page. Last night, I slept with this throw on top of my comforter (I like to sleep under the weight of 2 blankets). It was so soft and comfortable - something that I am not always used to with crochet blankets. While I love crocheting blankets, they aren't always as soft as I would like them to be. I am notorious for using cheap(er) yarn that isn't exactly soft to the touch. This blanket is different though. I wish I could pass you this blanket through the screen, so you could test it out for yourself, but for now you'll just have to take my word for it. For this throw, I used Red Heart Hygge yarn which is a basic acrylic yarn twisted with short fur. The result is a very soft and drapey bulky weight yarn that is perfect for blankets, sweaters, pillows, and more. Usually, I shy away from this yarn because it's over my $5/ball budget, but I found a great deal online ($4.90 CAD/ball at Blick Art Materials, plus free international shipping). About this Blanket: This blanket is worked width-wise, meaning that your starting chain is the width of your blanket (this will never change). As you crochet each row, your blanket becomes longer. Therefore, make sure that you are happy with the width of your chain before you begin. This blanket uses the lemon peel stitch to create a soft, squishy texture. The lemon peel stitch alternates between the single and double crochet stitch. This blanket features thick tassels on each corner, but these are optional. Instructions and a photo tutorial is provided below to guide you through the making process. This blanket is a simple rectangle that is designed to be a throw. However, it can easily be adjusted to be a baby blanket, or fit a twin, queen, or king size bed. Materials: *9.0 mm crochet hook Scissors *Yarn Needle *12 Skeins of Red Heart Hygge Yarn Weight 5 Bulky (70% Acrylic and 30% Nylon, 132 yd/ 121 m, 5 oz/ 142g) Colour - Lavender - Approximately 1540 yds used in this project 1 Bundle of Cotton Perle DMC Thread Weight 5 (100% Cotton, 27.3 yd/ 25 m) Colour - Colorfast (Purple) Alternative Yarn Option: Red Heart Hygge is a great yarn to work with, but it's nice to have options. A great alternative to this yarn is *Red Heart Soft Essentials. This yarn is a bulky weight 5 that is incredibly soft, has a nice sheen to it, and comes in 20 different colours. It is identical to the Red Heart Hygge yarn in weight and yardage, but it lacks the "furry" texture of the Hygge. Another great alternative would be the *Caron Latte Cakes. It is a self-striping bulky weight 5 yarn that looks very similar to the hygge fluffiness. I haven't used this yarn yet (it's on my list of yarns to try), so please make sure to check your gauge if you choose to use it. This blanket measures 41.5" x 61". Width: 41.5” Length: 61” Making Adjustments to your Blanket: Width: Your width is determined by your starting chain. The original pattern calls for chaining 86, but if you’d like to customize the width of your blanket (i.e. make it wider/less wide), your chain must be a multiple of 2 (ie. an even number). Length: Your blanket is worked width-wise, which means you have control over the length of your blanket. To make your blanket shorter, crochet less than 111 rows. To make your blanket longer, continue to repeat row 2 until you are satisfied with the length. Two rows of this blanket measure approximately 1" in length. Let's get to the pattern, shall we? Abbreviations: Ch - chain Beg - beginning Hk - hook St - stitch Sc - single crochet Dc - double crochet [] - Repeat the instructions inside these brackets. Gauge: Approximately 9 st x 8 rows in 4” x 4” Ch 11 Row 1: Dc in 3rd ch from hk, [sc in next st, dc in next st] to end of row. Turn. (5 dc + 4 sc) Row 2: Ch 2, dc in first st, [sc in next st, dc in next st] to end of row. Turn. (5 dc + 4 sc) Row 3 - 9: Repeat Row 2. The Lemon Peel Stitch/Link to a Video Tutorial This stitch is full of texture, but is created using simple stitches. It is made by crocheting one double crochet in the 1st stitch, followed by one single crochet in the 2nd stitch, followed by one double crochet in the 3rd stitch, and so on. This double/single crochet alternating pattern is repeated across the row. Each row in your blanket will start with a double crochet in the first stitch, and finish with a single crochet in the last stitch. If you get distracted and forget which stitch should be worked, use the following trick: every double crochet stitch is made in the single crochet stitch below it; and every single crochet stitch is made in the double crochet stitch below it. If you would like to see a visual of this stitch pattern, here is a great tutorial by Heart Hook Home. Pattern: Notes: The beginning chain 2 does not count as a stitch. Every row will begin with a double crochet in the first stitch and end with a single crochet in the last stitch. The last stitch of each row is worked into the beginning chain of the previous row to create a “straight” edge. [] - Repeat the instructions inside these brackets. ————————————————————————————————————————————— Ch 86 Row 1: Dc in Row 1: Dc in 3rd ch from hk, [sc in next st, dc in next st] to end of row. The last stitch should be a sc. Turn. (42 dc + 42 sc) Row 2: Ch 2, dc in first st, [sc in next st, dc in next st] to end of row. The last stitch should be a sc. Turn. (42 dc + 42 sc) Row 3 - 111: Repeat Row 2. *If you choose to make your blanket longer, keep repeating Row 2 until you are satisfied with the length of your blanket. Fasten off and weave in ends. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Making Tassels What blanket is complete without adding some tassels? We will be making 4 thick tassels to add to each corner of the blanket. These are optional, but if you choose to make them, you will need approx. 1/2 a ball of yarn and some thread or thin yarn of the same colour. Your thread or thin yarn colour can match your yarn completely, or be a different shade to add some contrast. I chose to use a slightly darker purple thread to make the tassel "pop". Tip: Before you start crocheting with your last ball of yarn, make your 4 tassels. This will ensure that you have enough yarn to make them AND your tassels will be "straighter". Using yarn from the end of the ball will make you tassels wavy/curly. For aesthetic purposes, tassels should be as straight as possible. *Make 4 tassels: Step 1: Wrap your yarn around a 6 - 8" book (depending on how long you want your tassels to be) approximately 25 times. Step 2: Cut the yarn in the center of the book with a pair of scissors. Step 3: Hold the yarn in place with your index finger, making sure the tassel is even on both sides. Step 4: Begin wrapping the tassel with thread approximately 15 times or until you are satisfied with the look of it. Step 5: Leave a long tail of thread to attach the tassel to your blanket, before you cut the thread. Step 6: With your yarn needle, move the thread through the center of the tassel to the top. Now you can begin to sew your tassel to your blanket. Weave the thread in and out, and knot it at certain places throughout your blanket to secure it. When you feel that it is secure enough, snip off any excess thread. And voila! You've added your first tassel to your blanket. Repeat Steps 1 - 6, three more times to make all of your tassels. End Notes: Congratulations! You just made your first Coziness is a Mood blanket! I hope you enjoyed making it as much as I did. If you use my pattern, please tag me in your posts because I’d love to see what you make (Instagram: @thispixiecreates). If you would like to explore some more fun and budget friendly crochet patterns on this blog, click here. Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you have made from this pattern; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates). Questions? If you have any trouble throughout the pattern and need some clarification - or find a mistake, please leave a comment down below, or reach out to me through the "Contact" section of this website. I would be more than happy to help! If you love experimenting with colour and texture, The Mountain Mama might be the next project for you. This blanket has tons of texture, created with simple stitches that are repeated throughout the pattern. It uses a large crochet hook and bulky weight yarn, so you will be finished in no time at all. Thank you so much for following along with me. Happy crocheting! Love, Dayna

How to Crochet the Burst of Sunshine Pillow

Hi guys! If you've been following along on my blog, you may have noticed that I like making pillows. I can't help it; once I start one design, I have a million ideas for more swirling around my head. Welcome to my third crochet pillow pattern designed to brighten up your home! This pillow is great for two reasons: it's soft and comfy - I challenge you to rest your head on this pillow and NOT fall asleep - and the cover is removable, making it easy to clean. If you love the half double crochet stitch and have always wanted to try bobbles, this is the perfect project for you. Let's get started! This post contains affiliate links that support the content on ThisPixieCreatesBlog. Each affiliate link has a * beside it. All opinions are my own. Find more information about affiliate links, as well as my Privacy & Disclosures Policy here. Thank you for your support! You can purchase an INEXPENSIVE Printable PDF of this pattern on Etsy HERE! This PDF includes the complete pattern and step-by-step pictures, so you can follow along on paper, highlight and make notes. It is a total of 10 pages including the cover page. About this Pillow: It is made in two pieces (front and back); sewn together on three sides; and a zipper is placed on the fourth side to make it removable for washing. The front piece is designed using single crochet, half double crochet and the modified bobble stitch. The back piece is made of repeat rows of half double crochet. This pattern is designed to fit an 18" x 18" pillow form. Why Design Pillows? While I love designing pillows, I crochet with a purpose. A few months ago, my husband and I made our first big home decor purchase: we bought an area rug for our living room! It looks a lot more vibrant than in the picture here, and is filled with shades of orange, yellow, red, blue, and white. It's colourful to say the least. Pulling some of the colours from the rug and placing them in other parts of the room has been tricky, so I figured, why not make pillows? I have about six 18" x 18" pillow forms, and a lot of yarn that needs to be used. So these pillow projects have been the perfect budget friendly project to add some colour, texture, and warmth to our living room. They were designed to be removable because we have two huskies who shed like crazy; for this reason, we need to constantly wash our pillows and blankets. Being able to remove pillow covers and toss them in the wash, without having to wash the ENTIRE pillow or make a trip to the dry cleaners, is such a blessing. My inspiration for this pillow design came from a duvet and pillow cover set from Urban Outfitters. So pretty and so textured! For my pillow design, I wanted my stitches to be tight, so I used a 5.0mm crochet hook. When I started to make the bobble stitches, I noticed that they weren't "popping" as much as I wanted them too. So, I modified the regular bobble stitch to make it more prominent. The Modified Bobble Stitch Normally, bobble stitches are made by double crocheting 5 stitches together (dc5tog). To make the bobble stitch more pronounced while using a smaller crochet hook, I triple crocheted 5 stitches together (tc5tog). The key to this stitch is making sure to yarn over twice before inserting your hook into the stitch! I will walk you through the stitch below: Step 1: Yarn over twice and insert your hook into the indicated stitch (A, B). Step 2: Yarn over and draw up a loop (C). Step 3: Yarn over and pull through only two loops on your hook (D, E, F). Repeat Steps 1 - 3, four more times. You should have 11 loops on your hook (H). Yarn over and pull through all 11 loops on your hook (H, I, J). Single crochet in the next stitch (K). And you're done! Materials: *3 Skeins of Red Heart Soft Weight 4 Medium (100% acrylic, 256 yd/ 234m, 141g/ 5oz) in Cinnabar - Approx. 665 yds used in this project *18" x 18" Pillow Insert (any sized pillow form can be used) *5.0mm crochet hook *Yarn Needle Scissors *16" Zipper Sewing Thread Sewing Needle My Mistake/Lesson Learned This pillow was meant to removable, so I decided to add a zipper. I used a 7" zipper on an 18" x 18" pillow form. Let's just say that while the zipper works great, the pillow cover can no longer be removed through the tiny opening. Lesson learned! So if you have a zipper at home, make sure your it's long enough before you sew it on; if it's not, buy one that will fit your pillow cover. I would recommend using a zipper that is either the same size as the pillow form (18") or 1 - 2" shorter (16 - 17"). This will ensure that your pillow cover can be removed easily for each washing. Pattern Measurements: This pillow cover is designed to fit an 18" x 18" pillow form. Front Panel: 18" x 18" Back Panel: 18" x 18" ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Let's get started on our Burst of Sunshine pillow! This pillow cover is made using 2 pieces (1 front and 1 back panel) that are sewn together on three sides, and closed with a zipper on the fourth side. Abbreviations: St(s) - stitch(es) Hk - hook Ch - chain Sc - single crochet Hdc - half double crochet mbob - modified bobble [] - Repeat the instructions inside the brackets according to the number of times indicated after the brackets. Gauge: Approximately 15 stitches x 11 rows in 4" x 4" You might be tempted to skip this step, but since the insert has to fit inside of our finished pillow cover, it is important that your gauge is accurate before you start crocheting. Ch 17 Row 1: Hdc in 3rd chain from hook and in each stitch across. (15 hdc) Row 2: Ch 2, hdc in each stitch across. (15 hdc) Row 3 - 11: Repeat Row 2. Pattern: Notes: The beginning chain of each row does not count as a stitch [] Repeat the instructions inside the brackets according to the number of times indicated after the brackets. Ex. [mbob in next st, sc in next 5 sts] 10 times, means you will make a modified bobble stitch, followed by 5 single crochet stitches, and this will be done a total of 10 times before moving onto the next instructions. Work the last stitch of each row in the beginning chain of the previous row. This will create a straighter edge. This pillow is made in two pieces (front and back panel) and sewn together on three sides, with a zipper on the fourth side. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Front Panel: Ch 68 Row 1: Hdc in 3rd ch from hk and in each st across. (66 hdc) Row 2: Ch 2, hdc in each st across. (66 hdc) Row 3 - 4: Repeat Row 2. Row 5: Ch 1, sc in next 3 sts, [mbob in next st, sc in next 5 sts] 10 times; mbob in next st, sc in last 2 sts. (11 mbob + 55 sc) Row 6 - 8: Repeat Row 2. Row 9: Repeat Row 5. Row 10 - 12: Repeat Row 2. Row 13: Repeat Row 5. Row 14 - 16: Repeat Row 2. Row 17: Repeat Row 5. Row 18 - 20: Repeat Row 2. Row 21: Repeat Row 5. Row 22 - 53: Repeat Row 2. Fasten off and weave in ends. Back Panel: Ch 68 Row 1: Hdc in 3rd ch from hk and in each st across. (66 hdc) Row 2: Ch 2, hdc in each st across. (66 hdc) Row 3 - 52: Repeat Row 2. Fasten off and leave a long tail (approx. 25 - 30") to sew your front and back panels together. Weave in all ends except for the long tail. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sewing Your Panels and Adding a Zipper This is arguably the worst part of any crochet project, but when it comes to pillows, it's exciting. You never know your pillow cover will turn out until you sew your sides together and pop in your insert. To sew these panels together, we will be using a technique called the whip stitch. If you are unfamiliar with this stitch, there is a great tutorial by Wool and the Gang to help you here. Method: Line up your front and back panels. You can use pins to keep them together, but this is optional. Thread your yarn needle with the long tail that you left. Begin whip stitching along the three sides of your pillow cover. The next step is to attach the zipper to the fourth side. Place the zipper between the front and back panels panels, making sure that it is centered on both sides (A). You will be sewing one side of the zipper to the front panel and the other side of the zipper to the back panel. Sewing the Zipper to the Front Panel: Using thread and a sewing needle, begin whip stitching across the zipper and front panel to sew them together; make sure that the needle moves through both the panel and the zipper (A, B). Tip: Try to sew the panel as close to the zipper opening as possible; this will ensure a seamless look. The picture below shows one side of the zipper sewn to the front panel. Sewing the Zipper to the Back Panel: Unzip the zipper before you begin to sew the back panel to the other side of the zipper. Using thread and a sewing needle, begin whip stitching across the zipper and back panel to sew them together; make sure that the needle moves through both the panel and the zipper (Photos below). If your zipper is an inch or two shorter than the width of the pillow, use your remaining yarn tail to sew up any gaps on the fourth side with the whip stitch. And You're Done! Voila! You have finished your first Burst of Sunshine Pillow. Congratulations! I hope that this pillow brightens up your home, and puts a smile on your face every time you see it. Now you can cozy up with this beauty, while you work on your next crochet project. Check out some more fun and budget-friendly crochet patterns on this blog. Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you've made from this pattern; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates). Questions? If you have any trouble throughout the pattern and need some clarification, please feel free to comment below, or send me a message through the "Contact" section of this website. I would be more than happy to help! If you liked this pillow project, and need to make another, try the Retro Velvet Circular Pillow. It's a fun, 1 skein project that works up quickly, and makes a super soft pillow! There isn't anything quite like resting your head on velvet. Thank you guys so much for following along. I can't wait to see what you create! Love, Dayna Instagram: @thispixiecreates

How to Crochet an Easy Cowl and Infinity Scarf that Looks Knitted

Hi guys! This week's blog post is all about learning to crochet a cowl and infinity scarf that looks knit. I have tried and failed (many times) to learn to knit, but I still love the tight stitching that only knitting can create. So if I can crochet an accessory that looks knit, I will do it. In this tutorial, we will be using the half double crochet stitch. This is a basic stitch that creates beautiful texture, depending on which loop its worked in. For most of the pattern, we will be working our half double crochet stitches in the 3rd loop only; but to create definition, we will be breaking up these rows with a row of half double crochet worked normally (in the front and back loops). Let's get started! This post contains affiliate links that support the content on ThisPixieCreatesBlog. Each affiliate link has a * beside it. All opinions are my own. Find more information about affiliate links, as well as my Privacy & Disclosures Policy here. Thank you for your support! My inspiration for these scarves came from my yarn choice. A few weeks ago, I found 3 skeins of Brights - I Love this Yarn at the bottom of my yarn stash. Not only is this yarn beautiful, it's also really colorful! This is a type of marled yarn that spins 4 colored strands together to create a candy cane effect. As you crochet, you will see different shades of pink, blue, purple, green, yellow, orange - basically any color of the rainbow is tucked inside this yarn. I chose to use simple stitches - half double crochet worked normally AND in the 3rd loop only - to highlight the beautiful color work in this yarn. Is it me, or does this yarn have a bohemian feel to it? While I love both scarves, I prefer the cowl because it slips over my head easily, and I don't have to do any additional looping to style it. Since it's a smaller version of the infinity scarf, it weighs a bit less, so it's easier to wear around the house when I get cold. This is just a personal preference though, so I can't wait to see which version you pick! About this Scarf: This scarf can be made into a cowl (a tight fitting circular piece) or an infinity scarf (a loose fitting circular piece that can be looped around your neck 2 - 3 times) by changing the number of chains worked at the beginning of the project. Instructions are provided for both types of scarves. This scarf uses a technique called the half double crochet in the 3rd loop only to create a knit-like stitch. This technique is best demonstrated in a video, so if you are unfamiliar with this stitch, here is a great tutorial to help you! These scarves are worked in the round by connecting your beginning chain to your last chain with a slip stitch; this forms a circle. Materials: *6.0mm crochet hook *Yarn Needle Scissors *Cowl: 1 skein of I Love This Yarn Gradient Weight 4 Medium (100% acrylic, 196 yd/ 179m, 4 oz/ 113 g) - Brights *Infinity Scarf: 2 skeins of I Love This Yarn Gradient Weight 4 Medium (100% acrylic, 196 yd/ 179m, 4 oz/ 113 g) - Brights Abbreviations: Ch - chain St(s) - stitch(es) Sl St - slip stitch Sc - single crochet Hdc - half double crochet Gauge: Approximately 16 st(s) x 13 rows in a 4" x 4" Swatch Pattern Measurements: Fits an adult with 22" head circumference The cowl is designed to fit loosely around the neck, while the infinity scarf can be looped twice with ease, or three times for a tighter fit. Cowl: Width - 6"; Length across while laying flat - 12.75" Infinity Scarf: Width - 6"; Length across while laying flat - 28" Making Adjustments to your Scarf: Length: Your initial chain determines the length of your scarf. The pattern calls for chaining 92 (cowl) and 210 (infinity scarf), but if you'd like to customize the length of your scarf (i.e. make it longer/shorter), chain any number until you are satisfied with the length. Width: If you want your scarf to be less wide, skip Round 11 - 15, and go straight to Round 16. If you want your scarf to be wider, repeat Round 11 - 15, before moving onto Round 16. Pattern: The beginning chain 1 does not count as a stitch. Instructions are written for the cowl first and the infinity scarf second. I.e. (92, 210) means that the cowl has 92 stitches, while the infinity scarf has 210. Round 5 is a round of normal half double crochet stitches worked in both the front and back loops. Round 19 is the only round of single crochet. Photos are done on a small swatch. Do not turn at the end of each round. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ch 92 (210); making sure that the chain is not twisted, join the last ch to the 1st ch with a slip stitch (sl st) to make a circle. Round 1: Ch 1, hdc in 1st ch, and in each ch across. Join the last hdc to the 1st hdc with a sl st (92, 210 hdc). Round 2: Ch 1, hdc in 3rd loop only in each st across. Join with a sl st. (92, 210 hdc) Round 3 - 4: Repeat Round 2. Round 5: Ch 1, hdc in each st across. Join with a sl st. (92, 210 hdc) Round 6 - 9: Repeat Round 2. Round 10: Repeat Round 5. Round 11 - 14: Repeat Round 2. Round 15: Repeat Round 5. Round 16 - 18: Repeat Round 2. Round 19: Ch 1, sc in each st across. Join with a sl st. (92, 210 sc) Fasten off and weave in ends! And You're Done! Congratulations! I hope you enjoyed making these scarves as much as I did. Now you can wrap yourself up in this beauty to keep you toasty warm on those cold days. Check out some more fun and budget-friendly crochet patterns on this blog. Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you've made from this pattern; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates). Questions? If you have any trouble throughout the pattern and need some clarification - or find a mistake, please feel free to comment below, or send me a message through the "Contact" section of this website. I would be more than happy to help! Looking for a New Project? If you loved this project and are dying to make a new scarf with lots of color work, you might like the Vintage Jean Tube Scarf. This scarf is also worked in the round to give you a double layer of protection on those cold days. Thank you guys so much for following along. I can't wait to see what you create! Love, Dayna Instagram: @thispixiecreates

How to Crochet the Vintage Jean Tube Scarf

Hi guys! It's still blistering cold here in Canada, and while the temperature has been fluctuating, I'm never sure if it's safe to leave the house without my scarf, hat, or mitts. As much as I dislike winter and all of the cold, dreary days it brings, there is something refreshing about being able to bundle up in your warmest layers, without breaking a sweat. Since the cold weather isn't going anywhere, why not crochet some cute winter accessories to keep you warm? In this tutorial, I will be teaching you how to crochet the Vintage Jean Tube Scarf. This scarf is designed to be a double layer to protect you against the cold weather; and trust me, it works. If you know how to half double crochet, then you are ready for this scarf! This post contains affiliate links that support the content on ThisPixieCreatesBlog. Each affiliate link has a * beside it. All opinions are my own. Find more information about affiliate links, as well as my Privacy & Disclosures Policy here. Thank you for your support! Inspiration: Sometimes, when I am searching for something on my phone, I end up in a rabbit hole. Why am I looking at pictures of baby hippos, when I was looking up dinner recipes? It's all a mystery. One night, I fell into a rabbit hole and found this beautiful striped knitted tube scarf by PurlSoho. Unfortunately, I can't knit, but it gave me an idea. I have never seen anyone make a crochet tube scarf before, so I figured that I would give it a try. Tube scarfs are designed for extra warmth (similar to a double layer or wrapping your scarf twice), and to keep your stitches from curling up. I designed this scarf using half double crochet clusters to be a moss stitch look alike. About this Scarf: This scarf is worked in the round, which means that you will join your base chain together with a slip stitch to make a circle. This scarf can be customized to fit you! There are instructions for how to adjust the width and length of your scarf below. It is made using pairs (clusters) of half double crochet stitches. If you are unfamiliar with half double crochet, here is a great tutorial to help get you started. Materials: *Lion Brand Jeans Weight 4 Medium (100% Acrylic, 246yd/ 225 m, 3.5 oz/ 100g) 1 Skein each of Colour A - Classic, Colour B - Top Stitch, Colour C - Vintage, Colour D - Brand New, Colour E - Faded --- (approximately 974 total yds used in this project). *5.0mm crochet hook Scissors *Yarn Needle Abbreviations: Ch - chain Sp - space Hk - hook Sk - skip St - stitch Sl st - slip stitch Hdc - half double crochet Cl(s) - cluster(s) [] - Repeat the instructions inside these brackets. Gauge: Approximately 8 hdc clusters x 13 rows in 4" x 4" Ch 17 Row 1: 2 hdc in 3rd ch from hk, [sk 1 ch, 2 hdc in next st] and in each ch across. (8 hdc cl(s)) Row 2: Ch 2, 2 hdc between each hdc cl across. (8 hdc cl(s)) Row 3 - 13: Repeat Row 2. Pattern Measurements: This scarf measures 7" across by 57" in length. Making Adjustments to your Scarf: Width: Your initial chain determines the width of your scarf. The pattern calls for chaining 50, but if you'd like to customize the width of your scarf (i.e. make it wider/less wide), your chain must be a multiple of 2. Length: To customize the length of your scarf (i.e make it longer/shorter), you can work each row until you are happy with the length. If you want your scarf to be shorter, work less rounds; and if you want your scarf to be longer, work more rounds. If you are following the colour breakdown chart below, you may have to tweak it to suit the new length of your scarf. Colour Chart: Changing Colour Method: In this pattern, there is a lot of colour work (as you can see by the large colour chart above). Changing colours can seem scary, but I promise that once you get the hang of it, it's really easy. Here is a photo tutorial, along with a few written instructions, to show you how I change colours throughout this scarf. When I get to the end of the round, I "pretend" to make the last half double crochet stitch in the orange yarn. I have 3 loops on my hook, and I would normally yarn over and pull my orange yarn through all 3 loops. Instead, I drop the orange strand of yarn, pick up my new yarn (blue), and pull it through the 3 loops on my hook. This will be my last stitch of the round, before I slip stitch and start a new round in blue. I have now made a slip stitch and chained 1. Before I start my new round using the colour blue, I will make sure that my orange strand of yarn is hanging off the back of my scarf (this will help me when I want to pick it up for the next round). I continue working the round in the blue yarn, but before I finish the final half double crochet, I drop the blue yarn. Instead, I pick up the orange yarn tail and pull it through the 3 loops on my hook. I make a slip stitch to finish my round, and make sure that the blue yarn is hanging from the back of the scarf. I continue to work the next round in orange. Continue to use this colour changing method as you work through the pattern. I really hope it helps! If you need further assistance or clarification, please leave a comment down below. I'd be more than happy to help. Pattern: The beginning chain 2 does not count as a stitch. Half double crochet clusters are 2 half double crochets worked in the same stitch/space. In Row 2 - 192, each half double crochet cluster is worked in the space/gap between two half double crochet clusters in the previous round. Do not turn at the end of each round. This tube scarf is worked in the round! --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ch 50; making sure that the chain is not twisted, join the last ch to the 1st ch with a slip stitch (sl st) to make a circle. Round 1: Ch 2, 2 hdc in 1st ch [sk next ch, 2 hdc in next ch] across. Join the last hdc to the 1st hdc with a sl st (50 hdc or 25 hdc clusters). Round 2: Ch 2, 2 hdc in sp between 1st two hdc clusters of previous row; 2 hdc in each sp across. Join with a sl st. (25 hdc clusters) Round 3 - 192: Repeat Round 2. Use the colour chart above to let you know when to change colours throughout the work. Fasten off and weave in ends! End Notes: Congratulations! You just made your first Vintage Jean Tube Scarf. I hope you enjoyed making it as much as I did. Now you can wrap yourself up in this beauty to keep you toasty warm on those cold days! Check out some more fun and budget-friendly crochet patterns on this blog. Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you've made from this pattern; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates). Looking for a New Project? If you loved this project and are dying to make a new scarf with lots of color, you might like the Easy Knit-Like Cowl and Infinity Scarf. This scarf is crocheted with simple stitches to highlight the color work in the yarn. Thank you guys so much for following along. I can't wait to see what you create! Love, Dayna Instagram: @thispixiecreates

How to Crochet the Simple Texture Pillow

Hi guys! Welcome to another DIY crochet project that will add some coziness to your space. Not only does this pillow look pretty, it's also comfy - a great quality of any pillow - and functional. This pillow case is designed to be removable, so you can wash it without having to toss in the entire pillow, or make a trip to the dry cleaners. This pillow cover can also be adjusted to fit any sized pillow form. If you have mastered the single crochet stitch, this is a perfect project for you. But, if you only came here for the blanket, here is a link to the blog post about this Easy Weighted Rainbow Blanket. This post contains affiliate links that support the content on ThisPixieCreatesBlog. Each affiliate link has a * beside it. All opinions are my own. Find more information about affiliate links, as well as my Privacy & Disclosures Policy here. Thank you for your support! I'm a huge fan of home renovation and design shows like Home Town and Fixer Upper. I could watch Erin and Ben all day! Watching these shows made me realize how trendy pillows have become. Pillows add a touch of warmth, colour and texture to every space; and can be placed on chairs, benches, couches, beds, outdoor furniture, and floors (of all places). Pillows designed to look handmade are especially trendy. A quick Google search yielded the following results from mass producers like Amazon, Wish and Wayfair. A trendy pillow can range from $7.00 - $100+, depending on the company, style, colour, or design. If you can hold a crochet hook, why not make your own? I find that I appreciate an item so much more when I know it's handmade. If you imagine all of the hours of work and love that's gone into making a piece, it will become a cherished part of your home. How Can I Save Money on this Project? Doing it yourself is always more fun than buying a ready-made item, but it can be expensive. The trick to saving money on DIY projects is either having the supplies on hand, or thrifting them. 1. Pillow Inserts/ Forms. Pillow inserts can be so expensive that it makes you think twice about starting a crochet project. You might ask yourself, "Wouldn't it make more sense to buy a new pillow and save myself the time and money?". The answer depends on where you buy your pillow forms. Before I learned about thrifting, I purchased pillows from Amazon and loved them for their quality and comfort level. *Amazon.ca has a set of 4 pillows for $36.00 CAD which works out to $9.00 CAD/ pillow. Amazon.com has a set of 4 pillow set for $26.49 USD working out to $6.62 USD/ pillow. However, you can save even more money by thrifting your pillows. In my area, our thrift stores include the Goodwill, Salvation Army, Bibles for Missions, and Value Village. So far, I've found pillows ranging from $1.49 - $6.99, depending on the style and size. Facebook Marketplace is another great thrifting resource. I found 3 18" x 18" pillows for $10! (Score). 2. Yarn. If you are a crocheter, you know how expensive yarn can be. Yikes! Before I make a large yarn purchase, I always shop around. Here are a couple of places I like to search for yarn: Local Craft Stores like Michael's, Joann's, or Hobby Lobby. These stores mark-up the price of yarn compared to a wholesaler, but you can use 40% off coupons to purchase each skein individually. Wal-Mart or Meijer. Unfortunately, I've never seen a coupon specifically for yarn at these retailers, but sometimes they have roll-back sales on yarn. Thrift Stores. Depending on where you are located, some thrift stores have a wide selection of yarn at a discounted price (since it's been previously owned). Amazon. Amazon usually offers free shipping (perfect for the online shopper), and often has good deals on certain brands of yarn. Facebook Marketplace. This is another resource for people looking to thrift their yarn. You may not find any people selling yarn, but it's worth a look. *Lion Brand Wholesalers. Lion Brand is usually having a sale on yarn, whether it's priced at 20%, 30%, 40%, or 45% off. The only thing you have to worry about is shipping. Materials Needed for this Project: *9.0 mm crochet hook *Yarn Needle Scissors *Lion Brand Wool-Ease Thick and Quick Weight 6 Super Bulky (80% acrylic, 20% wool, 106 yd/ 97 m, 6 oz/ 170 g) Fisherman 4 skeins --- used approx. 404 yds in this project *18" x 18" Pillow Insert Method/ Video Tutorial: To make this pillow, we will be single crocheting in the back loops only! Each stitch has a front and back loop; the front loop is the closest to you, and the back loop is the furthest from you. Normally, we crochet through both loops (front + back). However, working single crochets in the back loops only will create a ridge pattern that adds texture to your finished piece. If you prefer to learn through a video, I hear you! Here is a link to a tutorial that will show you how to single crochet in the back loops only. Pattern Measurements: This pillow cover is designed to fit an 18" x 18" pillow form. Front Panel: 18" x 18" Back Panel(s): 12.5" x 18" Making Adjustments to Your Pillow If you are working with a pillow insert that isn't 18" x 18", don't panic! This pattern can be adjusted to fit any sized pillow form. The first step is to measure your pillow. Length: Front Panel: This pillow cover is worked length-wise, which means that the starting chain will determine the length of your pillow case. Make your chain the exact length of your pillow OR no more than an inch shorter than the length of your pillow. Continue on with the pattern as normal. Back Panel: The back panels are also worked length-wise, so chain the same number of chains as the front panel. Width: Since the pillow cover is worked length-wise, the number of crocheted rows determines how wide your pillow case will be. Also keep in mind that by working in the back loops only, the fabric will be stretchy, so make sure to stretch out your panels before measuring them. Front Panel: If the width of your pillow is smaller than 18", work fewer rows (less than 39 rows); if your pillow is larger than 18", work more rows (more than 39 rows). Stretch out and measure your fabric to see if it is the proper width before you fasten off. Back Panel: Keep track of the number of rows you crocheted for the width of your pillow cover. Divide this number by 2, and add 1. For example, if your front panel was 31 rows wide, dividing by 2 gives you 15.5 = approx. 16 + 1 = 17. Therefore, each back panel will be 17 rows wide. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Let's get started on our DIY crochet pillow! This pillow cover is made using 3 pieces (1 front panel and 2 back panels) that are sewn together at the end. Abbreviations: Hk - hook St(s) - stitch(es) Ch - chain Sc - single crochet Blo - back loops only (only make your single crochet in the back loops) Gauge: Approximately 9 stitches x 9 rows in 4" x 4" Ch 10 Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hk, and in each st across. (9 sc) Row 2: Ch 1, sc in the blo in each st across. (9 sc) Row 3 - 9: Repeat Row 2. (9 sc) Pattern: Notes: The beginning chain 1 does not count as a stitch Work the last single crochet of each row in the Ch-1 of the previous row. This will create a straighter edge. This pillow is made up of 1 front panel and 2 back panels that are sewn together. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Front Panel: Ch 40 Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hk, and in each st across. Turn. (39 sc) Row 2: Ch 1, sc in the blo in each st across. Turn. (39 sc) Row 3 - 39: Repeat Row 2. Fasten off and weave in ends. Back Panel: *Make 2 Ch 40 Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hk, and in each st across. Turn. (39 sc) Row 2: Ch 1, sc in the blo in each st across. Turn. (39 sc) Row 3 - 21: Repeat Row 2. Fasten off and weave in ends. Repeat this process to make 2 back panels. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sewing Your Panels: This is arguably the worst part of any crochet project, but when it comes to pillows, it's exciting. You never know your pillow cover will turn out until you sew your sides together and pop in your insert. To sew these panels together, we will be using a technique called the whip stitch. If you are unfamiliar with this stitch, there is a great tutorial by Wool and the Gang to help you here. Method: We will be sewing one back panel at a time. Using the whip stitch, sew the first back panel to your front panel along the 3 dotted lines shown in the diagram below. Do not sew along the fourth inside length. The fourth edge is your opening for the pillow insert to fit through. Now, its time to sew your second back panel on. Your second back panel will overlap your first back panel by about 4 stitches. Therefore, you will be sewing through both the front panel and the first back panel along these 4 stitches. Line up your second panel and begin whip stitching along the 3 dotted lines shown in the diagram below. Do not sew along the fourth inside length. The fourth edge is your opening for the pillow insert to fit through. Your pillow case is almost complete! Insert your pillow to see how it looks. To hold my pillow case in place, I sewed 3 buttons onto the first back panel (green in the diagrams). Then, I pulled on the second back panel (red in diagrams) until I was happy with the position. I squeezed each button through a stitch in the second back panel to close. And you're done! Now you can snuggle up with your comfy pillow and remove it when it needs to be washed. And You're Done! Congratulations! You just made your first Simple Texture Pillow. I hope you enjoyed making it as much as I did. Now you can snuggle up with this beauty while you work on other projects. It really is as comfy as it looks! Check out some more fun and budget-friendly crochet patterns on this blog. Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you've made from this pattern; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates). Questions? If you have any trouble throughout the pattern and need some clarification, please feel free to comment below, or send me a message through the "Contact" section of this website. I would be more than happy to help! If you liked this pillow project, and need to make another, try the Retro Velvet Circular Pillow. It's a fun, 1 skein project that works up quickly, and makes a super soft pillow! There isn't anything quite like resting your head on velvet. Thank you guys so much for following along. I can't wait to see what you create! Love, Dayna Instagram: @thispixiecreates

How to Crochet the Retro Velvet Circular Pillow

Velvet is back! From couches to curtains to rugs to pillows, velvet is popping up everywhere. Velvet comes in an array of colours and is soft and silky to the touch, making it a great fabric for pillows. Before we dive into the tutorial, I would like to say that this is a beginner friendly pattern. If you know how to single crochet and double crochet, then you are all set! This post contains affiliate links that support the content on ThisPixieCreatesBlog. Each affiliate link has a * beside it. All opinions are my own. Find more information about affiliate links, as well as my Privacy & Disclosures Policy here. Thank you for your support! I've been watching a lot of Mad Men lately, and I keep seeing couches adorned in circular velvet cushions. After watching close to 6 seasons, I figured it was time to make one for my couch. I really love the design of the inverted button pillows (pictured below), but I also enjoy the simplicity of the plain round velvet cushions. I think the design I've created is a blend of the two, with a simple construction that is easy to work up. You will be amazed at how quickly this pillow will come together! About this Pillow: It is made using less than one skein of Bernat Velvet Yarn. Who doesn't love a project that only uses one skein? This pattern is designed to fit a 12" circular pillow form, but can easily be adjusted to fit any sized pillow form! This pillow is made using two crochet circles that are sewn together. To make each circle, we will start with a magic ring, and continue working in the round. Materials: *Bernat Velvet Weight 5 Bulky (100% Polyester, 315 yd/ 288m, 10.5 oz/ 300 g) in Softened Blue - 1 skein - used approximately 172 yds in this project 12" Circular Pillow Form *7.0mm Crochet Hook *Yarn Needle Scissors Abbreviations: Ch - chain Beg - beginning Sp - space Hk - hook Sk - skip St(s) - stitch/ stitches MR - magic ring Sl st - slip stitch Sc - single crochet Dc - double crochet [] - Repeat the instructions inside these brackets. Gauge: Approximately 11 dc x 5 rows in 4" x 4" Ch 14 Row 1: Dc in 3rd ch from hk, and in each ch across. (11 dc) Row 2: Ch 3, dc in each st across. (11 dc) Row 3 - 5: Repeat Row 2. Making Adjustments to Your Pillow: This pillow is 12" in diameter. However, if you decide to make your pillow using a different size pillow form (not 12" in diameter), don't worry! This pattern can easily be adjusted to fit any pillow form with some trial and error. Before we start, it's important to have a general understanding of crochet circles. If you look at the pattern below, you may notice a "mathematical pattern" happening. We start with 10 double crochet stitches as our base round, and every round after, we increase by 10 double crochet. Keep this in mind as you make your adjustments. Now, it's time to measure your pillow to determine the diameter (the total distance from one edge of your pillow to the other). Smaller: If your pillow form is smaller than 12", continue working the pattern until you are approximately 0.5" away from your desired diameter (ex. If you have a diameter of 11", you will continue to work double crochet rounds until your work measures about 10.5"). Then, work your last round in single crochet stitches to finish your circle. Larger: If your pillow is larger than 12", you will work Round 11 in double crochet stitches. Each round is increasing by 10 double crochet stitches; so Round 12 will have 120 double crochet, and Round 13 will have 130 double crochet. You will continue on with this pattern, until your circle is approximately 0.5" away from your desired diameter (ex. If you have a diameter of 14", you will continue to work double crochet rounds until your work measures about 13.5"). Then, work your last round in single crochet stitches to finish your circle. Pattern: Notes: The beginning chain of each round does not count as a stitch. This pattern is written to fit a pillow form of 12" diameter. If your pillow form is smaller or larger than 12", please read the "Making Adjustments to Your Pillow" section. Round 11 is the only round of single crochet. You will make two circles and sew them together to create your pillow! Making a Magic Ring tutorial. [] - Repeat the instructions inside these brackets. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Circle: Make 2 Make a MR. Round 1: Ch 2, make 10 dc in MR. Join with a sl st. (10 dc) Round 2: Ch 2, make 2 dc in each st around. Join with a sl st. (20 dc) Round 3: Ch 2, [1 dc in first st, 2 dc in next st] around. Join with a sl st. (30 dc) Round 4: Ch 2, [2 dc in first st, 1 dc in next 2 st(s)] around. Join with a sl st. (40 dc) Round 5: Ch 2, [1 dc in first 3 st(s), 2 dc in next st] around. Join with a sl st. (50 dc) Round 6: Ch 2, [2 dc in first st, 1 dc in next 4 st(s)] around. Join with a sl st. (60 dc) Round 7: Ch 2, [1 dc in first 5 st(s), 2 dc in next st] around. Join with a sl st. (70 dc) Round 8: Ch 2, [2 dc in first st, 1 dc in next 6 st(s)] around. Join with a sl st. (80 dc) Round 9: Ch 2, [1 dc in first 7 st(s), 2 dc in next st] around. Join with a sl st. (90 dc) Round 10: Ch 2, [2 dc in first st, 1 dc in next 8 st(s)] around. Join with a sl st. (100 dc) Round 11: Ch 1, [1 sc in first 9 st(s), 2 sc in next st] around. Join with a sl st. (110 sc) Fasten off, making sure to leave a long tail (about 20") and weave in the rest of your ends (excluding the long tail). Repeat this process to make a second circle! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sewing: Sewing is probably my least favourite part of any project, but when you start to sew the two circles together, you will be able to watch your pillow come to life. It's so exciting! To sew these circles together, we will be using a technique called the whip stitch. If you are unfamiliar with this stitch, there is a great tutorial by Wool and the Gang to help you here. Make sure that both of your circles are facing the right way. Line the circles up, making sure that the right sides are facing outward. Thread your yarn needle with the long tail you left (about 20"), and begin to whip stitch (work the needle under both loops of your stitches, and pull the yarn through). When you have sewn halfway around your circle, insert your pillow form. Continue to whip stitch around your circle. When you have sewn your last pair of stitches together, you will work your remaining tail through your work. I recommend making a knot before you cut your yarn tail - this makes your work more secure and will stop it from unraveling between washes. End Notes: Congratulations! You just made your first Retro Velvet Crochet Pillow. I hope you enjoyed making it as much as I did. Now you can snuggle up with this beauty while you work on other projects. Check out some more fun and budget-friendly crochet patterns on this blog. Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you've made from this pattern; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates). Questions? If you have any trouble throughout the pattern and need some clarification, please feel free to comment below, or send me a message through the "Contact" section of this website. I would be more than happy to help! If you liked this pillow project, and are dying to make another, try the Simple Texture Pillow. It's an easy removable pillow case that works up quickly with super bulky yarn and a large crochet hook. You will be amazed at how comfy and practical this pillow turns out to be. Thank you guys so much for following along. I can't wait to see what you create! Love, Dayna Instagram: @thispixiecreates

© 2019 by Dayna Perry of ThisPixieCreates. Proudly created with Wix.com

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