• Dayna Perry

DIY Macrame Wall Hanging Tutorial Using Scrap Yarn

Updated: May 26

Hi guys! I hope you are all staying safe and sane during this time because isolation can really take its toll on our mental health and creativity. It can be hard to know what to do with ourselves during this time. Do we relax and pretend like its a vacation? Do we take care of our homes? Focus on our health? Start a business? Create every day? I think we should do whatever will help us get through the day. If you want to take a bath and read a book, you do it! If you need to lie in bed and watch TV for the entire day (me), you do it! We shouldn't let the expectations of others determine how we spend our time. If you are having a hard time right now, and need to talk to someone, please don't hesitate to reach out to me. I'd be happy to listen.


Now, without further ado, let's dive into this macrame wall hanging!

This post contains affiliate links that support the content on ThisPixieCreatesBlog. Each affiliate link has a * beside it. All opinions are my own. Find more information about affiliate links, as well as my Privacy & Disclosures Policy here. Thank you for your support!


Since we're all stuck inside, and strongly discouraged to make trips to Michaels (even if they do curb side pick up), we have to use what we have on hand. Luckily, I had some yarn and half an embroidery hoop. It took me days to figure out what I wanted to do with this piece, but I promise that it will only take you an hour or so to make, since you have a template to follow.


Materials:

  • Approximately 200 - 300 yds of scrap yarn (every type of yarn I used is listed below)

  • *10" embroidery hoop (You can use any sized hoop, whether it be an embroidery hoop, macrame hoop, or hoola hoop)

  • Scissors

  • *Steamer OR an iron with a steam setting (optional)


My Yarn Choice:

If you like some of the colours in my wall hanging, I've included a link to each type of yarn I used below.

Other projects you might enjoy - shown in the picture above:

  1. Purple Hygge Crochet Blanket: How to Crochet the Coziness is a Mood Blanket

  2. Grey Arrow Striped Pillow: How to Crochet the Whimsical Stripes Pillow

  3. Green Pillow: Coming to the Blog Soon!


Reverse Lark's Head Knot Tutorial

The main knot that we are going to be using throughout the piece is called the Reverse Lark's Head knot. This knot is used to attach each strand of yarn to the hoop. I've included a photo tutorial below to show you how to attach each strand of yarn using a reverse lark's head knot. However, if you prefer to learn through videos, here is a link to a great tutorial by Modern Macrame.


  • Begin by folding your yarn strand in half, making a loop at one end.

  • Take the loop portion of the strand and insert it underneath your hoop.

  • Pull the loop up with your finger.

  • With your thumb and index finger, open the loop wide, while moving the two yarn strands up towards the loop, with your other hand.

  • Pick up the two yarn strands with your thumb and index finger, and begin to pull it through the loop.

  • Continue pulling the two strands through the loop until the ends are outside of the loop.

  • Grab the ends of the strands and slowly pull to close the loop. This will create a knot.

  • Tighten the loop as much as you can. You've just made a reverse lark's head knot!


Regular Knot Tutorial

The second knot that we are going to be using doesn't have a name (sorry guys!), so we are going to call it the regular knot. You will be making a total of 18 regular knots, and I promise that it's really easy once you get the hang of it. Below is a tutorial for making the regular knot.


  • You will be working with one strand at a time. Make sure that the strand is lying ON TOP of the hoop.


  • Move the end of the strand underneath the hoop.

  • Move the yarn tail OVER TOP of the portion that is lying on top of the hoop. This creates a loop/hole.

  • Place the yarn tail into the loop/hole by going underneath the top strand.

  • Pick up the yarn tail and pull it through the loop/hole.

  • Continue to pull on the yarn tail to close the loop/hole and make a knot. Tighten it as much as you can, to make sure it's secure.


  • You've made your first regular knot!


The Macrame Wall Hanging Tutorial

Now that you've learned how to make a reverse lark's head knot, and a regular knot, let's start making our wall hanging.


Step 1: Choose Your Yarn Colours and Textures

It's time to decide which colours and textures work well together. For my wall hanging, I wanted varying weights of yarn and texture to add some visual interest to the piece. I chose some weight 2, 4, 5, and 6 yarn, along with acrylic, wool, crimped, and hygge textured yarn. Play around with your yarn stash and see what you come up with!

For the top design, I chose neutral colours (A, B, and C) because I wanted to draw attention to it, without overpowering the bottom fringe. There was already a lot of colour and texture going on down there, so I didn't want to overdo it.


Step 2: Cut Your Yarn into Strands

  • For the top design, you will need 9 strands measuring approximately 54".

Colour A: 3 Strands

Colour B: 3 Strands

Colour C: 3 Strands


  • For the bottom fringe, you will need 35 strands measuring approximately 34".

Colour A: 3 Strands

Colour B: 19 Strands

Colour C: 5 Strands

Colour D: 3 Strands

Colour E: 3 Strands

Colour F: 2 Strands


Note: Some of my yarn was very thin, particularly Colour C and Colour F. While I loved the texture and colour of both yarns, I wanted them to stand out and fill more space within the hoop. To make them thicker, I cut multiple strands of each and attached them as one strand. For example, I bundled 4 strands of Colour C together before attaching it to the hoop. I also bundled 5 strands of Colour F together (picture below).


Step 3: Top Design

You will be working with your 9 longest strands of yarn (54").


  • Section #1: With a reverse lark's head knot (tutorial above), attach 3 strands of Colour A, about 1.25 inches to the right of the center of the hoop. You will now have 6 strands of yarn to work with.




  • Separate your strands, so that you are only working with the outer most strand. You will be making a regular knot to attach it to the bottom of the hoop (tutorial above).


  • Repeat the regular knot 5 more times, working with the next outer most strand, to finish off section #1.

  • Section #2: With a reverse lark's head knot, attach 3 strands of Colour B to the right of Colour A.

  • Separate your strands, so that you are only working with the outer most strand. You will be making a regular knot, approximately 3" to the left of Section #1, to attach it to the bottom of the hoop.






  • Repeat the regular knot 5 more times, working with the next outer most strand, to finish off section #2.


  • Section #3: Attach 3 strands of Colour C directly beside Colour B, using a reverse lark's head knot.

  • Separate your strands, so that you are only working with the outer most strand. You will be making a regular knot, approximately 3.5" to the left of Section #2, to attach it to the bottom of the hoop.

  • The 5.5" measurement is there to show you that the last strand of section #3 sits about 5.5" below the top of the hoop.


  • Repeat the regular knot 5 more times, working with the next outer most strand, to finish off section #3.


Step 4: Attaching the Colourful Fringe


Now that we've attached our 9 longest strands of yarn, it's time to add in some colour! We will be attaching each strand with a reverse lark's head knot to fill the space between our long strands. I've included a colour breakdown chart below to guide you through the number of strands and specific colours needed to fill each part.









Step 5: Steam and Cut

  • After attaching all of the yarn to the hoop, the final step is to steam the yarn ends and give the wall hanging a hair-cut. Steaming can be done using an iron (on steam setting), or a *garment steamer. If you choose to use an iron, make sure that it's 1-2 inches away from your yarn. You never want your iron to touch your fabric.

  • Using steam on your yarn will help get rid of any curls or waves in your wall hanging, allowing the yarn to lengthen and lie straight. For my wall hanging, I used a steamer to slowly work through each section. I found that it worked best when I moved the steamer from the top of the fringe to the bottom.


  • Once you are happy with how straight your yarn is, grab your scissors and cut your wall hanging. I gave the bottom fringe a bit of a semi-circle shape because I found that this looked best with the hoop. Each strand ended up measuring between 15 and 15.5" in length.




And You're Done!


You just made a macrame wall hanging! I hope that this project brightens up your home, and puts a smile on your face every time you see it. If you want to try more fun projects to add to your space, click here to explore my blog.


Disclaimer: You are welcome to sell items that you've made from this pattern; however, you are not allowed to use my pictures or sell my pattern as your own (Copyright @ ThisPixieCreates).

Questions?

If you have any trouble throughout this tutorial and need some clarification, please feel free to send me a message through the "Contact" section of this website. I would be more than happy to help!


Thank you guys so much for following along. I can't wait to see what you create!


Love,

Dayna

Instagram: @thispixiecreates

  • Ko-Fi
  • Pinterest
  • Instagram
  • YouTube
  • Facebook

© 2019 by Dayna Perry of ThisPixieCreates. Proudly created with Wix.com

  • Facebook
  • YouTube
  • Ko-Fi
  • Pinterest
  • Instagram